No Such Thing As Perfect by Emma Hughes #NetGalley #20booksofsummer

I am delighted to share my review today for No Such Thing As Perfect by Emma Hughes. This is a book that was not originally on my #20booksofsummer reading list, but is now another one I have swapped in!

I requested an advance copy of this book from Random House via NetGalley. My review is my own.

No one’s life is as perfect as it looks.

Least of all Laura Morrison’s. (Although she’s not sure how perfect hanging onto your job by a thread and sleeping on an air mattress at your sister’s looks, in all honesty.)

When Laura gets the chance to trial Cupid – a high-tech new dating service which will draw on everything she’s ever done online to find her perfect match – she figures it’s got to be worth a try.

She can’t believe her luck when good-looking, kind considerate Adam turns up for their first date. On paper he’s…well…perfect.

But when Laura develops feelings for the person who led her to Adam in the first place, familiar doubt creeps in.

Maybe for life to start falling into place, Laura has to learn to let go…

My Review…

As the synopsis for this book tells you, life for Laura hasn’t been great. So when an invite to trial a new dating service arrives she decides to give it a go. Laura is a journalist and she can use her experience of the service to hopefully help her keep her job.

This is a light and fun read. Following Laura as she goes through her days and then her meeting with her potential perfect match. As this is supposed to be an easy way of meeting and finding your partner it is supposed to take the some of the doubts and lies out of the start of a new relationship.

I liked the idea of this book, using algorithms to find a potential match is great. As we know, algorithms are great but that do have peculiarities so I was waiting for a twist along the way.

Laura has other problems in life and this did help bring other characters into the story along with family and friends. These characters add a good range of personalities and give different advice and opinions.

Overall a light-hearted story that had a few surprises. If you are a fan of contemporary romance then I do think this is one you would enjoy and it’s one I would recommend. 

Many thanks for reading my post, a alike or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

The Face at the Window by Ruby Speechley @rubyspeechley @HeraBooks @BOTBSPublicity #thriller #suspense #bookreview

I am delighted to be one of the reviewers opening the Blog Tour and to share my review today for The Face at the Window by Ruby Speechley. The cover and synopsis were intriguing when I saw the email for this and joining the Blog Tour. My huge thanks to Sarah at BOTBSPublicity for my spot on the tour and for arranging my e-copy.

They’re in your house.

They want your life.

And now, they have your baby.

To the world, I’m @HappyWife. Online, people only see my picture-perfect home, my handsome husband, Nick, and my beautiful baby, Thomas.

They don’t see the real Gemma Adams. They don’t see my past, the dark secrets I’m hiding in my marriage. They don’t see the fear I live in every single day.

But I know someone is watching me. And now, they’ve taken Thomas.

I just don’t know why.

But I’m going to stop at nothing to get my baby back.

Even if it destroys everything I’ve got to find him.

A compelling thriller, packed with suspense – fans of K.L. Slater and Lisa Jewell won’t be able to put it down.

My Review…

The cover for this book definitely caught my eye. It has an unsettling synopsis and one that made me intrigued before I even started it.

Gemma is married to Nick, and everything about being a mum to Thomas is new. He’s only 5 days old and she is trying to do some shopping. When one of her employees spots her and offers to help, Gemma is only too happy to. After all, she knows this person and trusts them!

This is a suspense novel that is told in differing timelines and from differing perspectives. It caught me initially but as I got to know the characters I was able to differentiate between them.

The author has woven a story that is about a missing baby. It does, however, have more to it than that, it does sound like I am downplaying the severity of the baby, honestly, I am not. The baby is the finale in some ways even though it’s at the beginning. The story that follows is the lead up to that climax and you get all the whys, who’s and where’s.

His was a story that definitely hooked me. Even though you will guess early who he who is going to about the journey that takes place between the characters.

This one was an addictive read as I was so curious. Took a route I didn’t expect and it was a route I enjoyed. This is one for readers who like mystery, intrigue and stories set in a domestic setting. I would happily recommend this book.

About the Author…

Ruby Speechley is the author of four psychological thrillers published by Hera Books. She loves writing about domestic situations with plenty of twists and secrets.

She was born in Portugal but has lived in the UK since she was three months old. She now lives in Cheshire with her husband and two of her three children and two dogs. She has an older son and grandson.

Check out the other stops on the Blog Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

The Doll by Yrsa Sigurdardottir #NeyGalley #20booksofsummer #PublicationDay @HodderBooks #suspense #bookreview

Firstly, Happy Publication Day to Yrsa Sigurdardottir on her latest novel The Doll. This is my 6th book choice that I am delighted to share my review for as part of for #20booksof summer reading challenge.

My thanks to the publisher Hodder & Stoughton for my e-copy request via NetGalley. My review is my own. I still get the creeps when I see this cover!!!

It was meant to be a quiet family fishing trip, a chance for mother and daughter to talk. But it changes the course of their lives forever.

They catch nothing except a broken doll that gets tangled in the net. After years in the ocean, the doll a terrifying sight and the mother’s first instinct is to throw it back, but she relents when her daughter pleads to keep it. This simple act of kindness proves fatal. That evening, the mother posts a picture of the doll on social media. By the morning, she is dead and the doll has disappeared.

Several years later and Detective Huldar is in his least favourite place – on a boat in rough waters, searching for possible human remains. However, identifying the skeleton they find on the seabed proves harder than initially thought, and Huldar must draw on psychologist Freyja’s experience to help him. As the mystery of the unidentified body deepens, Huldar is also drawn into an investigation of a homeless drug addict’s murder, and Freyja investigates a suspected case of child abuse at a foster care home.

What swiftly becomes clear is that the cases are linked through a single, missing, vulnerable witness: the young girl who wanted the doll all those years ago.

My Review…

I am so glad I had a digital copy of this book rather than a physical copy. I mean, that cover! It so creepy and unsettling.

The doll is discovered during a fishing trip by a young girl out with her mum and a family friend. Later that night the mother dies, the police agree that is was an accident. Rosa is adamant that she wasn’t and that her mum was murdered. She is ignored and her pleas fall on deaf ears.

This is a slower paced police procedural that is set in Iceland. It is a book in the Children’s House series but can easily be read as a stand alone. It did take me a while to get my head around the characters as initially a few were introduced over a short period. I did soon however remember who was who.

The plot of the story is one that is interesting and I was intrigued as to why the doll was so important. It wasn’t until the latter stages that I eventually got the answers. There is several plots going on in this story and it was complex but it did make sense during the reading.

It looks s heavier on the descriptions and details and even though I did like this it did slow the pace down considerably. Fine is you like a more in-depth procedural. It does add a tension and suspense aspect to the story as you have to wait longer for the clues to connect.

I enjoyed this story, a complex and intriguing crime thriller that I would recommend. 

AND JUST IN CASE YOU WANT TO SEE THAT COVER AGAIN…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Her White Lie by Jackie Walsh @JackieWalsh_ie #NetGalley @HeraBooks @BOTBSPublicity #crime #thriller #PublicationDay #bookreview

I am delighted to be one of the Book Bloggers opening the Blog Tour today and share my review today for Her White Lie by Jackie Walsh. This is a wonderful first for me by this author and I will be looking at reading more of her books.

My huge thanks to Sarah at Book ON The Brightside Publicity for my spot on the Blog Tour and for arranging my e-copy of this book via NetGalley. Also a very Happy Publication Day to Jackie xx

Her dream wedding might become a nightmare

Tara Moore feels like the luckiest girl in the world. She’s finally found the man of her dreams, and after the fairytale wedding, she’s leaving Dublin to start a new life in Australia.

Until Avril Ryan’s body is discovered in a house that Tara lived in three years ago.

Tara doesn’t know Avril, so why was she the last person Avril called? How has she become the number one suspect?

But what the police don’t know is that Tara’s past conceals her own dangerous secrets. And as the detectives start digging and old friendships come to light, Tara begins to wonder who she can trust.

Will her wedding day become her last?

Purchase from Amazon UK

My Review…

This was a very enjoyable read and a first for me for this author. I did like the twisty and intriguing plot.

The story alternates between two main characters, Tara who is counting down the days until her marriage to Lucas. The other is Faye, a childhood friend of Tara’s. They had been inseparable from 8 years old, although in the past three years they had not been close at all.

The author alternates between the two women and this is a great way of getting both sides to a story. One problem is that one side isn’t very reliable. This doesn’t mean that one is good or one is bad, as the other has a secret that is niggling away. It is obvious that something happened in the past, but quite what and why is kept a mystery until much later in the story.

I have to say I wasn’t a fan of either of the women, but the storyline I really did like. The women come across as being very different. One appears strong and confident, the other a worrier. Needing reassurances.

The author gradually weaves her tale, she starts to sow seeds of doubt that had me hooked to what could possibly happen next. Whatever I thought may happen. didn’t, instead, the author sprang a few surprises.

I enjoyed this story a lot, there is a touch of psychological thriller and there is the obvious crime as there is a body. A very good introduction to this author for me and I will be looking at some of her earlier books. This is one for those that like their crime and thriller reads that are not blood, guts and gruesomeness, but more on the mysterious side. There is a police presence in this book but I would necessarily put this in a police pr0cedural. It is one I would happily recommend.

About the Author…

Jackie Walsh lives in Dublin with her husband Paul and dog Layla. She is a member of the Irish Writers Centre and The Irish Crime writer’s group. After years spent building her own business she decided to take time out and pursue her interest in writing. With a lot to learn, Jackie attended classes, writing groups and travelled to lots of festivals and launches. She secured a publishing deal with Hera Books who published Familiar Strangers and The Secrets He Kept in 2019, Five Little Words in 2020 and Her White Lie which will be published in July 2021.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

This Fragile Earth by Susannah Wise @susannahwise @RandomTTours @Gollancz #dystopian #bookreview

I am delighted to share my review today for This Fragile Earth by Susannah Wise. I really enjoyed this dystopian book set in the near distant future.

My huge thanks to Anne at Random Things Tours for my spot on the Blog Tour and for arranging my fabulous copy of this book.

Not long from now, in a recognizable yet changed London, Signy and Matthew lead a dull, difficult life. They’ve only really stayed together for the sake of their six year old son, Jed. But they’re surviving, just about. Until the day the technology that runs their world stops working. Unable to use their phones, pay for anything, even open the smart door to their flat, Matthew assumes that this is just a momentary glitch in the computers that now run the world.

But then the electricity and gas are cut off. Even the water stops running. And the pollination drones – vital to the world, ever since the bees all died – are behaving oddly. People are going missing. Soldiers are on the streets. London is no longer safe.

A shocking incident sends Signy and Jed on the run, desperate to flee London and escape to the small village where Signy grew up. Determined to protect her son, Signy will do almost anything to survive as the world falls apart around them. But she has no idea what is waiting for them outside the city…

My Review…

Beginning in London in the not too distant future machinery starts to fail. Everything is machine-based from water supplies and electricity to cars, computers, doctors and everything that makes everyday life easier.

Realising this may not be a glitch Signy with her son Jed decide to make the journey to her mother’s house. Pollution is something that is more advanced than today, special glasses to protect eyes, safe drinking water is just the very basics that have to be taken into consideration. Transport is down, no cars, trams, buses just an old heavy bike is all that is available to Signy as she makes her journey. Leaving London behind.

This is a very atmospheric book and one that involves futuristic science. The author has used the extinction of bees as being one of the important factors in her futuristic world, this is coupled with a computer system that controls everything from planting and growing of food, medical advice and treatment, pretty much everything.

As Signy and Jed make their journey, the author gradually fills in what has happened and what could potentially be happening as things change. It is a chance to pose questions, delve into living conditions, explore the science of this changing world.

As much as I really enjoyed this story and I did find it addictive, I did find that Jed did start to grate on my nerves. A child who is incredibly clever and one that doesn’t always have a sense of respect. While Signy does her best, I could feel her frustrations with the constant questions and felt the pressure building.

This is a book that I found interesting, there were some of the science things that I didn’t understand, but sort of got the gist of. There is a moralistic thread in this story as we look at how today’s environment is standing on a precipice. It is this that makes this sort of near-future story more believable. Advances in technology, reliance on machinery and gadgets all help to add an authentic feel.

This was a really good read, it is one for those who like atmospheric, slower-paced intriguing and thought-provoking reads. A dystopian novel set in the near future and one I would recommend reading.

About the Author…

Portrait. 2012, Credit Johan Persson/

SUSANNAH WISE is an actor and writer who grew up in London and the Midlands. The death of her
father in 2015 was the catalyst for THIS FRAGILE EARTH. His preoccupation with astronomy and the
beauty of the night sky formed the jumping-off point for the story. Susannah studied at the Faber
Academy, graduating in September 2018, during which time she wrote a second, more peculiar novel.
Both books have been longlisted for the Mslexia prize. She lives in London with her partner and son.

Check out the other stops on the Blog Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

The Country Village Summer Fete by Cathy Lake @LakeAuthor @Tr4cyF3nt0n #CompulsiveReaders @ZaffreBooks #contemporaryfiction #bookreview

I am delighted to share my review today for The Country Village Summer Fete by Cathy Lake. This was a gorgeous summery read and one that I adored.

My huge thanks to Tracy Fenton at Compulsive Readers and Zaffre for my spot on the Blog Tour and for my copy of this book.

A feel-good, uplifting summer read for fans of Heidi Swain and Cathy Bramley.

Emma Patrick’s life is spiralling out of control. On the cusp of her 50th birthday, she suddenly realises that she doesn’t have many meaningful relationships in her life. She’s single, successful, living alone and thinks she’s loving it, but being so focussed on work and always online means she’s lost any real connection to people.

When Emma gets a call to say her ageing father is becoming increasingly confused, she decides that she should go back home to the countryside to spend some time with him. But returning to Little Bramble, the village she grew up in, after all these years, is filled with complications of its own and people she’d rather avoid.

As Emma starts to settle in to her childhood home, she finds herself loving village life – much to her surprise. When the opportunity to get involved in the running of the summer fete comes her way, before she knows it she’s embracing jam making, cake baking and bunting. And with romance brewing, Emma begins to doubt the glamorous life in London that she worked so hard to build . . . 

My Review…

What a wonderful book this was as I got to know Emma as she returned to her childhood home of Bramble Village.

After finding herself wandering around a Tesco store at a ridiculous time of the morning she realises she needs a break from her life and career in London. She decides to return home when she hears her Dad has not been the best.

This was a wonderful story to disappear into for a few hours. A story that tells of how Emma had run away from the life that already seemed planned, instead of spending 30 years working hard, not fully embracing life and discovering she is running herself to the ground.

Being home opens old memories and brings heartache as she remembers things that have happened. She imagines people in the village will be hostile towards her and fears that the community has moved on. Things have indeed changed, but what makes the community is still there. The author brings a lovely sense of warmth, compassion and understanding to her village setting. A buzzing community with a sense of looking out for anyone who lives there.

This was such a wonderful read, it is a story of friendship and life, of family and friends. Moving on and accepting the past has happened but learning that it is ok. It is a story that had me smirking, feeling a sense of loss and also maybe the odd happy tear.

This is one for readers who enjoy a good bit of escapism reading, it has a lovely story with some friendly characters. It is one for contemporary romance and fiction readers and one that I would recommend. 

About the Author…

Cathy Lake is a women’s fiction writer who lives with her family and three dogs in beautiful South Wales. She writes uplifting stories about strong women, family, friendship, love, community and overcoming obstacles.

Check out the other stops on the Blog Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Going Greek by Sue Roberts #NetGalley #bookouture #romance #bookreview

I am delighted to share my review today for Going Greek by Sue Roberts. I requested this book via NetGalley and it is due for publication next week (28th May2021)

57412479. sy475

Sun, sea and a sizzling romance… the perfect holiday, right? Wrong.

After a work party gone disastrously wrong, Samantha suddenly finds herself jobless and jilted. So when her sister invites Sam to stay at her little whitewashed farmhouse on a Greek island, Sam leaps at the chance to escape. Before long, she’s trundling up the cobbled driveway, almost colliding with sexy neighbour Spyros.

It isn’t all sunshine and smiles though. For every afternoon spent lounging by the pool, cocktail in hand, there is a morning spent adjusting to life with boisterous six-year-old nieces. When Spyros invites Sam to explore the island with him she’s tempted, but with his carefree, live-for-the-moment attitude, he couldn’t be more different to Sam with her five-year plans and high-maintenance hair. One drink, as friends, couldn’t hurt though? Over glasses of fruity Greek wine and honey-sweet baklava, can he – and the other charming locals – help city girl Sam to appreciate the simple pleasures the Greek life has to offer?

Just as Sam is considering ditching her designer gear for good though, she runs in to an old flame from home, and suddenly her London life comes hurtling back. Can her smooth-talking ex convince Sam to return to the concrete jungle, or will the lessons she’s learned from her Greek escape persuade her to stay?

A fun, fabulous and completely laugh-out-loud summer read perfect for fans of Carole Matthews, Jenny Colgan and Sophie Kinsella.

My Review…

I have read and enjoyed a few of this authors books, so when I saw her latest one out I immediately grabbed a copy. I mean the setting is Greece so straight away I am imagining the food and the setting.

Sam is a television presenter, she has worked hard to get where she is. She has a squeaky clean profile, with no skeletons. This is she has been so career-focused. It has been all she has thought about since she was a little girl. Until she is snapped kissing a man who turns out to be married! She was unaware and suddenly she is being trolled on social media and is in hiding. Escaping to her sister sheep farm in Greece gives her a chance to hide and reassess her life.

This is another enjoyable read from this author and once again she has given me a gorgeous setting to imagine myself in, surrounded by family and friends. Sam gets a shock when she bumps into an old flame and does have a rather nice on the eye neighbour. As she isn’t sure which way her life is going to go she stutters around not really getting anywhere.

I do like this author and I really enjoy her books, this one felt a little flat on the romance side. I mean there is some eye fluttering, the odd peck and the like but not the anticipation or the build-up to a steamy romance. In some ways, this was as if Sam was holding too dearly to her public image, or maybe once bitten twice shy as far as trusting men.

This was a relatively quick read and I did think it progressed a little too quickly. I would have liked a little bit more romancing, all the same, a very nice story and one I was glad to have read. I would definitely recommend this author and I would recommend this latest book.

57412479. sy475

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Pathfinders by Cecil Lewis @I_W_M @angelamarymar @RandomTTours #wartimeclassics #bookreview

I am delighted to share my review today for Pathfinders by Cecil Lewis. This is a wartime classis that is being republished by the Imperial War Museum.

I wish to thank Anne at Random Things tours for my spot on the Blog Tour and for arranging my copy of the book.

Here is some information about the Imperial War Museum…


IWM (Imperial War Museums) tells the story of people who have lived, fought and died in conflicts
involving Britain and the Commonwealth since the First World War.

Our unique collections, made up of the everyday and the exceptional, reveal stories of people, places, ideas
and events. Using these, we tell vivid personal stories and create powerful physical experiences across our
five museums that reflect the realities of war as both a destructive and creative force. We challenge people to
look at conflict from different perspectives, enriching their understanding of the causes, course and
consequences of war and its impact on people’s lives.


IWM’s five branches which attract over 2.5 million visitors each year are IWM London, which will open
extensive new Second World War and The Holocaust Galleries in autumn 2021; IWM North, housed in an
iconic award-winning building designed by Daniel Libeskind; IWM Duxford, a world renowned aviation
museum and Britain’s best preserved wartime airfield; Churchill War Rooms, housed in Churchill’s secret
headquarters below Whitehall; and the Second World War cruiser HMS Belfast.

57402641

IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUMS TO PUBLISH ANOTHER NOVEL IN THEIR WARTIME CLASSICS SERIES FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE FAMOUS MEMOIR SAGITTARIUS RISING


In May 2021, IWM will publish two more novels in their Wartime Classics series which was launched in
September 2019 to great acclaim, bringing the total novels in the series to ten. Each has been brought back
into print to enable a new generation of readers to hear stories of those who experienced conflict firsthand.


First published in 1944 and set over the course of one night in 1942, the story follows the fate of six crew
members of a Wellington bomber ‘P for Pathfinder’ thrown together by chance from different corners of the
world. They each reflect on the paths of their own lives, as they embark on a fateful mission deep into the
heart of Nazi Germany. Cecil Lewis’ novel examines the life of every man in turn, rendering a moving
account of each as not merely a nameless crew member, but as an individual with a life lived, ‘a life precious
to some, or one… these men with dreams and hopes and plans of things to come.”


Cecil Lewis was a flying instructor for the RAF during the Second World War where he taught hundreds of
pilots to fly, including his own son. It was while doing this training that he wrote Pathfinders. Pupils were
graded by the time it took them to fly solo – the best became fighters and then bombers. The RAF’s Bomber
Command was the only branch of the armed forces that could take direct action against Germany and in
1942 the strategic air offensive changed from precision to area bombing where whole cities were targeted in
order to destroy factories as well as the morale of those who worked in them.


The ‘pathfinders’ of the story were needed because often the bombers could not find the towns and cities
they were destined to attack at night, let alone the industrial centres within. The crew used coloured marker
flares to guide the bombers to their targets and the crews selected (often from the USA, Canada and NZ as
well as Britain) were the best night flying crews who were able to find the target unaided. As a pilot who
took part in both World Wars, Cecil Lewis brings his unique experience to bear, shining a light on this vital
and sometimes contested aspect of Britain’s Second World War focusing on the sacrifice made by the Allied
airmen it depicts.


IWM Senior Curator, Alan Jeffreys, has written an introduction to each book that provides context and the
wider historical background. He says, ‘researching the Wartime Classics has been one of the most enjoyable
projects I’ve worked on in my years at IWM. It’s been very exciting rediscovering these fantastic novels and
helping to bring them to the wider readership they so deserve’.

My Review…

I am so glad that The Imperial War Museum has republished this book. Originally published in 1944 I was expecting a book that focused mainly on World WarII, instead, I got a great book that told me of individuals and their personal lives.

Pathfinders is a fabulous read and the focus is on the crew of P for Pathfinder, a Wellington bomber. The crew are of mixed nationalities from as far afield as Canada and Australia. The author begins this book with quite a sombre opening and gives details of where the war is at, or at what stage it is at. He then goes onto delve into the background of each of the crew.

Each crew member gets a chapter and the author gives a brief history of the parents and living conditions or lifestyles of the time. It then goes into more detail about the crew member and how or why they made the journey to join up.

This is a very insightful and quite a poignant book that has some wonderful descriptions and observations, at times it leans toward a literary fiction style and I found these sections to be such a pleasure to read. It is not an action-packed book as such but it does feel very personal.

There is an introduction at the beginning of the book from one of the historians of the museum. I didn’t read this as I just wanted to get straight into the story, but I did glance over it afterwards.

This is a book that I really enjoyed, it gives each crew member a face and a story rather than just being part of a bomber. It is a book that readers who like WWII accounts, stories and historical fiction readers will enjoy. Something a little different for me compared to my usual reads and one I would recommend.

About the Author…

Cecil Lewis (1898 – 1997) was a British fighter ace in the First World War and his
memoir Sagittarius Rising became a classic of the literature from that war, considered by many to be the
definitive account of aerial combat. He was a flying instructor for the RAF during the Second World War where he taught hundreds of pilots to fly, including his own son. After the war he was one of the founding
executives of the BBC and enjoyed friendships with many of the creative figures of the day, including George
Bernard Shaw, winning an Academy Award for co-writing the 1938 film adaptation of Shaw’s Pygmalion. He
had a long and varied career but retained a passion for flying all his life. In 1969 he sailed a boat to Corfu
where he spent the remainder of his life, dying two months short of his 99th birthday. He was the last
surviving British fighter ace of the First World War.

Check out the other stops on the Blog Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Comatose by Jane Badrock @janebadrock @QuestionPress @zooloo2008 #ZooloosBookTours #crime #mystery #bookreview

I am delighted to be one of the Book Bloggers opening the the Blog Tour today and to share my review for Comatose by Jane Badrock. This is a police procedural and it was a very addictive and well plotted one.

My huge thanks to Zoe at Zooloo Books Tours for my spot on the Blog tour and for arranging my e-copy of the book.

COMATOSE…and her nightmare is just beginning.

Two car crashes, one location, one survivor.

Newly promoted DS Karen Thorpe is determined to prove these are no accidents. But the only witness is in a coma.

Now there’s a rapist on the loose.

Karen’s in the fight of her life… and her boss isn’t on her side.

My Review…

I do like a good twisted police procedural and Comatose is just that. The synopsis gives very little away and therefore my review is going to be quite vague!

A crash is just the start of things for newly appointed DS Karen Thorpe, what looks like a road traffic accident maybe something more, at least this is what Thorpe thinks. When she hints at the accident maybe something else, she finds herself limited, hitting brick walls that have no right being there. She is kept out of something but doesn’t know why.

One of the victims survives and is left in a coma, Thorpe wants to get to the bottom of the case but it is nigh on impossible when your only witness is unresponsive. This is a case that will involve a lot of head-scratching, legwork and a certain amount of gut instinct.

Thorpe is not the most likeable character I have come across in a police procedural, but boy is she tenacious. She works ridiculously long hours, often taking work home and never letting up. She works hard and therefore so should everyone else. She is abrupt, snappy and demanding. She is also very good at her job.

During the course of this story, the author does explore Thorpe’s character and adds some useful personal details, it gives a slight idea as to her nature. To be honest, the way the author has approached this character makes sense, as someone who isn’t as committed would not get anywhere near discovering the truth of what turns out to be a complex case.

There are quite a few characters in this novel and I did find myself wrong-footed with them occasionally, but as I got to know them and their roles they became more cemented in my memory. A complex case does require a certain amount of characters and especially one that has some interesting sub-plots as well.

I really enjoyed this book and I did like the full-on intense investigation. police procedural with a strong mystery to it and one that I found very difficult to put down. It is one I would recommend.

About the Author…

Jane writes novels, short stories and poems, usually with a good dose of humour in them. She’s probably owes it all to her late grandmother who, she’s just found out, also wrote short stories and poems. She tends to get an idea and then run with it whether it be a 100 word short story or an 80 thousand word novel. It all depends on the voices in her head at the time…

Follow her at – Facebook Instagram Twitter Amazon Goodreads

Check out the other stops on the Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Geiger by Gustaf Skördeman #Geiger @ZaffreBooks @Tr4cyF3nt0n #compulsivereaders #NetGalley #thriller #bookreview

I am delighted to share my review today for Geiger by Gustaf Skördeman. This is a tense conspiracy thriller that I thoroughly enjoyed and is published tomorrow (29th April 2021).

My huge thanks to Tracy at Compulsive Readers for my spot on the Blog Tour and for arranging my e-copy of this fabulous book via Net Galley.

56918133. sx318

For fans of  I Am Pilgrim, GEIGER is set to become the must-read international thriller of 2021. 

The landline rings as Agneta is waving off her grandchildren. Just one word comes out of the receiver: ‘Geiger’. For decades, Agneta has always known that this moment would come, but she is shaken. She knows what it means.

Retrieving her weapon from its hiding place, she attaches the silencer and creeps up behind her husband before pressing the barrel to his temple.

Then she squeezes the trigger and disappears – leaving behind her wallet and keys.

The extraordinary murder is not Sara Nowak’s case. But she was once close to those affected and, defying regulations, she joins the investigation. What Sara doesn’t know is that the mysterious codeword is just the first piece in the puzzle of an intricate and devastating plot fifty years in the making…

Purchase link – Amazon UK

My Review…

Well, the synopsis for Geiger is definitely intriguing, well I thought so, it also makes for a very good start to this story.

This is a really good and well-plotted spy thriller that I really enjoyed. There is a blend of past and present that the author links together really well and is full of little subplots. The present is about the death of Stellan, and of his missing wife as well as the character of Sara a police officer with connections to the family. The past is more in the eighties with the fall of the Berlin Wall, German reunifications, USSR, GDR, spies, espionage, theories, politics and various other items of the time.

The mix of historical into this story was the part that I probably enjoyed the most, the cloak and dagger spy stuff if you like. But then I also liked the present story with a more procedural presence to it as you would find in a crime thriller. The idea of having a historical aspect in the story is great as it does add a great amount of intrigue. There is a good amount of detail that emerges as part of the story, this does however slow the pace down. I do like a slower paced book, and it meant I could take my time and not feel rushed while I was reading. I was able to read with the flow of the story and absorb the many details.

The author has a good mix of characters, enough for the different parts of the story and the different subplots, but not too many that I lost track of who was who. I did mention that there is a whole range of different things going on in this story, one of the themes is quite a distressing one and one I didn’t expect. While it is part of the story, it doesn’t make for pleasant reading.

A story that starts with a murder that then develops into a central European espionage ring, with mentions of family, upbringing and lifestyle there is a lot going on. A really intriguing and interesting read that had me wondering who was who and why they did what they did. I would recommend this for readers who prefer a slower-paced and intense spy-thriller story.

Check out the other stops on the Blog Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx