Archie and the Enchanter by Alexander Weir @weir_norman #childrensfiction #BookReview

I am delighted to share my review for Archie and the Enchanter by Alexander Weir. My thanks to Publishing Push and Alexander for getting in touch and sending me an e-copy of this fabulous childrens book.

Let me show you what it is all about…

This is for 8 – 12 year olds.

It takes place on Scotland’s wild West Coast where Archie discovers an ancient and supernatural set of bagpipes.

The magical bagpipes do impossible things. The music it makes is powerful.

Through its music, history begins to change.

It’s not the bagpipes but the chanter that is supernatural (the chanter is the part of the bagpipe that the piper uses to make music).

The chanter is probably more than 1,500 years old and yet looks brand new.

The name ‘chanter’ comes from the word ‘enchanter’ – and ‘enchant’ is what it does. The origins of the enchanter are shrouded in mystery. It disappeared before the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745. Perhaps the Young Pretender, Bonnie Prince Charlie, would have won through if the Enchanter had been around.

Then our hero, a scruffy little boy called Archie, found it, and this book is about what happened next.

Let me also share the introduction to this magical story…

Archie and the Enchanter – Introduction

‘No one knows where it came from. It was found in a heathery glen by a shepherd tending his sheep. The shepherd was keeping a wary eye on the horizon for Viking raiders and for a moment looked down. And there it was shining silvery at his feet.

What it could and would do was a constant source of amazement. It didn’t seem to age, and despite the passage of the centuries it always looked as shiny and new as it had been when it was found. It became a treasured possession of one of the Highland clans. Its ownership was kept a closely guarded secret although the Royal Stuarts knew about it and called upon it to be used in their quest for power.

Then it was lost. Everyone in the clan searched, but no one found it. The chanter entirely disappeared during Scotland’s troubled times at the close of the seventeenth century.

Who knows how the conflict at Culloden would have turned out if it had been there.’

This is a wonderful story to read and I can see it being a real hit with the age group it is aimed at.

Archie is a wonderful character and one that seems to get himself into mischief without trying, I say mischief but what I actually mean is gets dirty, ruins his clothes and just seems to attract dirt from wherever he goes, much to his mums annoyance. Archie goes to visit his Grandfather and while Grandfather is asleep Archie goes exploring and comes across a very old set of bagpipes, as Archie already plays this instrument he is immediately interested.

Archie finding the old bagpipes is just the start of the story really, as the story then changes tempo as Archie discovers what the pipes can do. What follows is a wonderful tale that not only delves into a little Scottish history, but also gives some facts about bagpipes and of course what Archie gets up to.

The bagpipes have a wonderful magical quality that has quite an impact on the small Scottish Community where Archie lives. The story also has a moral.

Archie is a wonderful character who I really liked, along with a few of the other people who I briefly met. The author has done a really good job of creating an exciting story and at the same time adding little snippets of information that help me learn something as I read.

The setting descriptions were good, enough to get a sense of place but not too much to take away from the story for a younger reader. It has excitement, magic and quite a few chuckle moments in it to keep you entertained, well it did me!

This is the first in a planned series and it is a great introduction, I got to meet Archie, his family and some of the local community. This is a really good start to the series and I think the age group of 8-12 years feels about right, though I think 8-10 is more appropriate.

It is a story that has a older feel to it, by this I mean it is not full of modern technology so maybe I mean more of a whimsical classic children’s’ style to it.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I think children will enjoy it, I did and I would recommend it.

For Further Reading

If you head over to the Publishing Push Blog Site there is a great article that gives you a chance to read an excerpt of Archie and the Enchanter, there are also some really interesting facts and info there as well. You can follow the link HERE

You can order a copy of the book from Amazon

Alexander Weir is married, with two children together with his wife, and three dynamic go-ahead grandchildren. He lives in a small community in a remote part of Scotland’s Argyll Coast. As part of the community, he teaches art to the children in the community home school and, come evening time, they join him in the family room for ‘story time’. The imagination of the children has been captured in this tale, and author Alexander and his family, are keen to see Archie’s escapades being enjoyed by other children of similar ages too.

He has serialised both books and have been read on Argyll FM radio and covering Ulster, with an outreach across Kintyre, Knapdale, and Northern Ireland. In addition, he has introduced the books to children in Canada and Ireland – and received an enthusiastic response. Alexander is also the Editor of a quarterly Scottish Fellowship of Christian Writers literary magazine, called ‘WordWise’.

Alexander gained his MSc from London South Bank University, and has worked a varied career from Railway Manager, to Missionary, Vice Chairman of Savanne Winery in Tbilisi (Georgia), and Company Secretary, General Manager and Director for two London-based companies. He retired from Business Life in London in 2012.

His writing has not only focused on children’s historical fantasy. Alexander is also author of a peer reviewed medical research paper, and of two theological books, ‘A Question of Time’ and ‘A Question of Identity’.

For more information visit Alexander’s Website or visit him on Twitter Facebook

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Million Eyes by C.R. Berry @CRBerry1 @rararesources #BookReview

I am delighted to share my review for Million Eyes by C.R. Berry. This is a book that has its toes dipped in a few genres and so in a way it makes it a book that may intrigue many readers… it certainly intrigued Me!

Let me show you what it is all about…

How do you fight an enemy who has a million eyes?

What if we’re living in an alternate timeline? What if the car crash that killed Princess Diana, the disappearance of the Princes in the Tower, and the shooting of King William II weren’t supposed to happen?

Ex-history teacher Gregory Ferro finds evidence that a cabal of time travellers is responsible for several key events in our history. These events all seem to hinge on a dry textbook published in 1995, referenced in a history book written in 1977 and mentioned in a letter to Edward III in 1348.

Ferro teams up with down-on-her-luck graduate Jennifer Larson to get to the truth and discover the relevance of a book that seems to defy the arrow of time. But the time travellers are watching closely. Soon the duo are targeted by assassins willing to rewrite history to bury them.

Million Eyes is a fast-paced conspiracy thriller about power, corruption and destiny.

Purchase LinksElsewhen PressAmazon UKAmazon US

I have to say that I do like a good conspiracy every now and again in my reading, Million Eyes has more than one conspiracy, in fact it has several that have been wonderfully woven back and forth in this historical /time travel fiction book.

Now where to start, Million Eyes, well I could tell you what Million Eyes is but I won’t, you will have to read the story to discover the details. There are several other things I could tell you, but… yep you guessed it… I’m not going tell you about them either lol!

So what I will tell you is that Ferro, a history teacher, has stumbled across something that could, if released to the public, turn what we know about our history on its head. He is obsessed with what he has found and wants to know more. Jennifer Larson has been following his blog and is intrigued, together they start to piece little snippets and leads together until they discover that there are obscure accounts that have been documented over the years that indicate that people from the future have been interfering, they have left evidence!

This has been very well written and as I have discovered from trying to write my review about this book, keeping a timeline that makes sense and doesn’t get muddled and confusing is a very difficult thing to do, but the author has pulled it off brilliantly so that it flows wonderfully.

The author has used parts of history and then spun them into a great setting for the story line that see’s the reader transported across centuries as a witness to the what unfolds. Given the fact that this is a story that does flit back and forth it is very easy to follow and know where in history you are. This attention to setting and timeline details is great.

I was enjoying this book a lot and liked the mystery and conspiracy elements to this story, then towards the 60% stage of the book little bombshells started to be dropped. I suddenly knew what Million Eyes and other things in the story were. This is the stage where I felt the story quicken its pace, or was that me suddenly desperate to know more and so began to read faster?

There are a few characters in this story and they are easy to keep up with, the settings are good and the timelines are clear. The story line is full of twists and turns that you don’t really get the full effect of until a lot later in the book and then you get the eureka moment without realising one was due! I do hope that makes sense …

This is a book that I thoroughly enjoyed, it is a mix of genres so if you like history, fiction, mystery, time travel or conspiracy theories in your reading then I really do recommend giving this book a read. It is the first in a planned trilogy and has been left with hints of a cliff hanger, but also nicely wrapped up to a point.

C.R. Berry caught the writing bug at the tender age of four and has never recovered. His earliest stories were filled with witches, monsters, evil headteachers, Disney characters and the occasional Dalek. He realised pretty quickly that his favourite characters were usually the villains. He wonders if that’s what led him to become a criminal lawyer. It’s certainly why he’s taken to writing conspiracy thrillers, where the baddies are numerous and everywhere.

After a few years getting a more rounded view of human nature’s darker side, he quit lawyering and turned to writing full-time. He now works as a freelance copywriter and novelist and blogs about conspiracy theories, time travel and otherworldly weirdness.

He was shortlisted in the 2018 Grindstone Literary International Novel Competition and has been published in numerous magazines and anthologies, including Storgy, Dark Tales, Theme of Absence and Suspense Magazine. He was also shortlisted in the Aeon Award Contest, highly commended by Writers’ Forum, and won second prize in the inaugural To Hull and Back Humorous Short Story Competition.

He grew up in Farnborough, Hampshire, a town he says has as much character as a broccoli. He’s since moved to the “much more interesting and charming” Haslemere in Surrey.

Social Media Links – TwitterFacebookWordPressGregory Ferro’s Blog Million Eyes

See what other Book Bloggers think of Million Eyes by checking out their stops on the Blog Tour

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow #Bookreview

I am delighted to share my thoughts on The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow. This is a fabulous and fantastical read that I thoroughly enjoyed. I have a paperback copy of this book and it is gorgeous, my photo really doesn’t do this book justice, it has gold embossing on the keys and it is just a stunning cover!

Let me show you what it is all about…

EVERY STORY OPENS A DOOR

In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke, she feels little different from the artefacts that decorate the halls: carefully maintained, largely ignored and utterly out of place.

But her quiet existence is shattered when she stumbles across a strange book. A book that carries the scent of other worlds and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure and danger. Each page reveals more impossible truths about the world, and January discovers a story increasingly entwined with her own.

I really enjoyed this book so much, it was fabulous to delve into the worlds that the author has created for her main protagonist January.

January is a girl who doesn’t quite fit in, she is an in-between person who lives with the very wealthy Mr Locke. Locke is her guardian and looks after her while her father is off travelling and collecting artefacts. As January starts to feel where she fits in society she becomes more aware of her differences and also of the restrictions that Locke imposes on her. Living in a large house surrounded by artefacts, curios and all manner of different things, she becomes aware that she may actually be part of his collection.

This is such a good read that I within the first saw few chapters I felt the addiction. It has a whimsical fantasy feel that also had a historical and literary fiction vibe to it. It is a story of stories or a story within a story as I followed January on her journey through life. Along the way, I learnt of her parents and of their travels and meetings.

The journeys the author takes January on are ones that force this young girl to grow up quick. They put her in danger as she tries to discover the truth of her life and also of her parents. These journeys are wonderfully written and describe with some fabulous imagery.

This is a slower-paced story and gave me a chance to enjoy the writing and the story. It covers various emotions such as loneliness, isolation and abandonment but equally it is about hope, determination and stubbornness to continue. So has a nice balance to it.

This is a really well-written book that I thoroughly enjoyed and I would recommend it to readers who like fantasy stories.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be fabulous 🙂 xx

Revolution by Piet Hein Wokke #histfic #Bookreview

I am delighted to share my thoughts on Revolution by Piet Hein Wokke today with you. This is a book that I chose to review, let me show you what it is all about…

Do we ever really fight over religion?

Or do we use religion to fight?

Escape to the Middle East in this thrilling tale about Khalid, Abdullah and Jalal – young men who try to shape the kingdom of Beledar.

While the nearest battlefields of WWII are hundreds of miles of away, on the streets of Mayasin, the capital of Beledar, Abdullah struggles to survive. In a remote village, Khalid sets out in search of his father, and must face the brutal laws of the desert.

Jalal, the young king, wants to break through nepotism and corruption, but in a conservative, Islamic country, change doesn’t come easy. That the western world preys on his country’s oil fields, doesn’t make his life any easier either.

In this exciting book, Wokke expertly and poignantly shows the roots of modern conflicts in the Middle East, through the people and ideas that inhabit it.

This is a wonderful story that pulls together ideals, politics and culture to create a story that is set in the Middle East. It charts the stories of Abdullah and Khalid two boys from different parts of the region who grow up to have very different roles and also of a man who is to become King.

This was such an interesting read and one that I found quite addictive. It has quite a lot going on and so I took a little more time with it. It covers many different aspects of life in the Middle East and uses politics and religion quite a lot to add intrigue and suspense to the story.

The lives of the two boys are really interesting as well. One is a a boy who is struggling to make enough money so that his family can eat. The other decides to follow his brother and leave school. While the man who becomes King has ideas to help the people of his country.

I loved the way the author made me feel completely immersed within this story and while I do not have a great knowledge of the Middle East I did understand all the things that were going on. Life in the royal palace was like a game, a very dangerous game. Distrust, spies, backstabbing and conspiracy were very evident. I liked this notion of not really knowing who could be trusted.

The cultural aspects were interesting and I liked the author showed the differences from where the boys started to where they ended up. Also the differences in how men and women where expected to behave and how some where trying to bring changes to a male dominant society.

The story is told in alternating chapters from the perspectives of Abdullah and Khalid. I liked how I was able to follow their own journeys and how they changed and reacted to various situations as the story gradually unfolded. Jalal also has a few chapters and seeing how he coped with power was really interesting.

The story delves into other aspects of human nature such as trust, loyalty, truth, expectation and a matter of faith. These become tested in various ways through the story and it is interesting to see how the characters deal with the challenges they face.

This is a book that I read over three days and was one of those books that I found I better grasped with the extra time I spent reading it. There are various plots and conspiracies going on through the story that I needed time to digest so I didn’t get myself confused. The author has a background in politics and also Middle Eastern History and I think this has definitely helped with the story-lines.

By the end of the book I found that many things had been answered and felt complete but, there were also some new questions that I had and I hope that there will be another book to follow on from this one. The ending of this one has an ending that just begs for another book and the story to continue.

This is a book that I think readers of historical fiction would enjoy and it is one I would recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Children of Fire by @cw_beatty @rararesources #Bookreview

I am delighted to share my thoughts on Children of Fire by Paul CW Beatty as part of the Blog Tour with Rachel’s Random Resources. My thanks to Rachel for my spot on the Tour and for organising my e-copy of this book.

Lets see what it is all about…

Can Josiah solve the puzzle before more people die, or is he out of his depth?

In 1841, at the height of the industrial revolution in the North West of England, Josiah Ainscough returns from his travels and surprises everyone by joining the Stockport Police Force, rather than following his adopted father’s footsteps into the Methodist ministry.

While Josiah was abroad, five men died in an explosion at the Furness Vale Powder Mill. Was this an accident or did the Children of Fire, a local religious community, have a hand in it. As Josiah struggles to find his vocation, his investigation into the Children of Fire begins. But his enquiries are derailed by the horrific crucifixion of the community’s leader.

Now Josiah must race against time to solve the puzzle of the violence loose in the Furness Vale before more people die. This is complicated by his affections for Rachael, a leading member of the Children of Fire, and the vivacious Aideen Hayes, a visitor from Ireland.

Can Josiah put together the pieces of the puzzle, or is he out of his depth? Children of Fire won the Writing Magazine’s Best Novel Prize for 2017

Purchase Links – Amazon UKUS

This is a historical fiction and crime novel that is set in the North West of England in 1841. Josiah is a constable who is asked to go to see a local religious group called the Children of Fire to see if they had anything to do with a recent explosion at the powder mill.

I will say that this book took me a few chapters to get into, there were several characters I had to get my head around and for some reason this took me a while. Gradually I started to become familiar with the names and their roles in the story and things started to fall into place and became easier to follow. There is quite a few things going on in the book as I followed Josiah into his investigation, met the Children of Fire members and also the local families.

I gradually started to find my interest in the book increasing, and I like the slower pace, it seemed to suit the slower pace of life for the setting. Being a hist/fic novel I like to come across things relevant to the time a book is set. This took me into some interesting facts about the powder mills and gunpowder. There were some really interesting facts that were given as part of Josiah’s investigation. The author had worked these facts and other issues into the story very well.

As I said this is a slower paced book, but there was a good amount of intrigue Josiah’s case continued, it often seemed that as he was starting to make headway something else would crop up only to add more mystery. As I passed the half way point of the story I noticed a slight shift in the pace and then things were starting to link up and took me to quite a dramatic conclusion.

This was a book that I enjoyed and is full of interesting history relevant to the time. If you like a slower paced historical fiction that has an intriguing crime element then give this one a try. It is one I would recommend.

Paul CW Beatty is an unusual combination of a novelist and a research scientist. Having worked for many years in medical research in the UK NHS and Universities, a few years ago he took an MA in Creative Writing at Manchester Metropolitan University emerging with a distinction.

His latest novel, Children of Fire, is a Victorian murder mystery set in 1841 at the height of the industrial revolution. It won the Writing Magazine’s Best Novel Award in November 2017 and is published by The Book Guild Ltd. 

Paul lives near Manchester in the northwest of England. Children of Fire is set against the hills of the Peak District as well as the canals and other industrial infrastructure of the Cottonopolis know as the City of Manchester.

Social Media Links – Twitter

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

The Louise Fawley Symphony by Rikki Evans @RikkiAuthor @rararesources #Bookreview #Giveaway (Open Int)

I am delighted to share my thoughts for The Louise Fawley Symphony by Rikki Evans. This is a modern romp of a read, there is also a giveaway at the end of my post to tempt you with 🙂 My thanks to Rachel for my spot on the Blog Tour and for arranging my e-copy of the book.

Meet Louise Fawley – the newest, sassiest and sleaziest agent in Her Majesty’s Secret Service. 

Follow Louise as she burgles and bungles at Melusine Plastics, gets flirtatious and salacious in Vetchley Castle, grows amorous and glamorous in Sainte-Modeste, and finally, hooks and sinks her villainess on the super-yacht Bonquonne.

The Louise Fawley Symphony contains material of a sexually explicit nature, so will not be to the taste of every adult reader.

Purchase Links Amazon UK or US

This is a book I saw and thought I would give it a go. It kind of falls outside what I would normally pick, but it did look like mad-cap fun. Louise Fawley is a lottery winner and has left her old job. She decides to break into her old bosses factory to cause mischief, unfortunately she gets caught in the process. She is given a choice and the result of her decision is to be a member of a little known department of the secret service.

This at times, a tongue in cheek read with several references to bigger well known brands, such as the supermarket Pennypinchers and social media platform Scrapbook and I am sure there are some that I have missed!

Louise Fawley is a character that just cannot seem to help getting into trouble and soon finds herself out of her depth as she is plunged into her assignment.

This is fast paced and I did feel at times that I was running to catch up. The author has a distinctive writing style especially in her conversations. This occasionally caught me off guard and I back tracked and re-read the odd sentence. The style of writing is quite modern and and I think this adds to the pacing of the book.

As the synopsis suggests Louise is a sleazy and sassy so I did expect some steamy scenes, and that is what I got and then some!

Overall I did enjoy this book and I am glad I took a chance on it. It is a modern, fun romp into the world of Louise Fawley who is a bit of a whirlwind. I would recommend this book as I did chuckle quite a few times with some of the antics.

After more than twenty-five years in accountancy, Rikki quit the profession to care for a parent whose health had deteriorated, and to give more time to those interests and hobbies which had helped render accountancy almost bearable.

Rikki’s interests include all things historical, from castles to candlesticks, music of many genres, from Gregorian Chant to Brit Pop, and above all, like HE Bates, is happiest when working and whiling in a garden.

Social Media Links FacebookTwitter

Giveaway to Win 1 x Signed Paperback of The Louise Fawley Symphony (Open INT)

*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

Here is the Rafflecopter Link

Good luck xx

See what other Book Bloggers think by checking out their stops on the Blog Tour

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be wonderful 🙂 xx

The Reunion by Guillaume Musso #Bookreview

I am delighted to share my thoughts on The Reunion by Guillaume Musso. I read this book a month or so ago and though it was about time I shared my review. I seem to have a few book reviews laying in the drafts section of my blog awaiting release!

Let me show you what The Reunion is all about…

WELCOME TO A SCHOOL REUNION YOU WON’T FORGET

FRENCH RIVIERA, WINTER 1992
On a freezing night, as her high school campus is engulfed by a snowstorm, 19-year-old Vinca Rockwell runs away with Alexis, her philosophy teacher.

No one will ever see them again.

FRENCH RIVIERA, SPRING 2017
Formerly inseparable, Thomas, Maxime and Fanny – Vinca’s best friends – have not spoken in twenty-five years. But when they receive an invitation to their school reunion, they know they must go back one final time.

Because there is a body buried in that school…

…and they’re the ones who put it there.

This is the first time I have read a book by this author. The premise of a school reunion has been turned into a dark and intriguing read. I have never been to a reunion and, while I do get the idea of catching up with old friends, it is not something I would enjoy. Yes, they would be old friends but also they would also be strangers to me.

The main character is Thomas, he is an author who is attending the reunion and while there he meets his own small group that he was friendly with at school. This group all have a secret and it is not the same secret. Gradually as the story unfolds the true depth of the past in unravelled. SOmethings that had been alluded to or guessed are finally unveiled in their true light. There are several things that have happened and, while they are connected they are also separate.

This book moves along at a good pace and flits between different times. I did find it initially confusing as the first couple of chapters where quite quick so I didn’t have time to find my feet with the story. Then the chapters gradually lengthen and I felt more interested in the story. I can’t say I liked any of the characters, they all seem to have a secret and this led to a general feeling of distrust towards them.

The book has a dark and devious feel to it, I would say it is a thriller as such due to the present day things going on. There are lies, secrets and an air of suspense though at times I did find it confusing and found that occasionally my attention was drifting from the story.

As I mentioned this is the first time I have read a book by this author and even though it did not fully have me enthralled and at times I got a bit confused, though I did enjoy it and I would definitely buy another book by this author.

The Reunion is a book that would suit readers who like a dark and twisted thriller story. I would recommend it.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be fabulous 🙂 xx

A Grave for Two by Anne Holt #Bookreview

I am delighted to share my thoughts on A Grave for Two by Anne Holt. I received this book as part of a giveaway by Readers First. This is the first time I have read a book by this author and I Admit that I will be reading more!

Let me show you what it is all about…

‘Anne Holt is the godmother of modern Norwegian crime fiction.’ Jo Nesbø

Selma Falck has hit rock bottom. Having lost everything – her husband, her children and her high-flying job as a lawyer – in quick succession, she is holed up alone in a dingy apartment. That is until Jan Morell – the man who is to blame for her downfall – rings her doorbell, desperate to overturn a doping accusation against his daughter, Hege – Norway’s best female skier. He’ll drop his investigation into Selma, but only if she’ll help… With just weeks until the Olympic qualifying rounds, clearing Hege’s name, and getting Selma’s own life back on track, seems impossible.

But when an elite male skier is found dead in suspicious circumstances, the post-mortem showing a link to Hege’s case, it becomes clear to Selma that there is a sinister web of lies, corruption and scandals lurking in this highly competitive sport. As time starts to runs out, another person is found dead, and Selma realizes that her own life is at risk…

This is the first time I have read anything by this author and she has left me with a curiosity to read more. The main protagonist of this story is Selma Falck, a woman with a past history and intriguing life. I met her as she was in a dingy flat as she has no job prospects and things look grim and uncertain. She is given a second chance when the father of the number one women’s Norwegian skier comes to ask for her help. The skier is Hege Chin Morell, she has been accused of taking an illegal drug and it threatens her Olympic dreams.

Along with Hege, another athlete is also brought into the story. Though its his death that is in question. There are several threads of other story lines that the author has woven into A Grave For Two and she deals with corruption, cronyism, drug and doping accusations as well as a more personal look into Selma’s life.

This is a wonderful read and a slow burner that is intriguing and has well woven story-lines. The investigation that Selma embarks on takes her down some dubious and shady paths. I liked how the author flitted between all the different threads and gradually built up the story towards its climax. For the most of the story I was addicted and found it very interesting reading, but then as the end approached I found myself loosing that addiction. I felt that things were dragged out a little too much. At this point for me a lot of the questions had been answered and there was still the odd revelation to be revealed but it just felt like it slowed in pace a little. It may that my tiredness didn’t help as I was trying to finish the book before going to bed.

Even though I felt a little disappointed by the ending, I still enjoyed the vast majority of the story and it has left me wanting to know more about Selma and what has happened in her life up to this point. This is an author who I will be revisiting in the future.

This is a story that I would recommend to readers who like a slow burn to their mysteries, with suspicion and corruption and a personal side stories.

Many thanks for reading my post 🙂 xx

The Demons Beneath by W.D. Jackson-Smart @wdejackson @damppebbles #Bookreview

I am delighted to welcome you to my thoughts on The Demons Beneath by W.D. Jackson-Smart today. My huge thanks to Emma at dampebbles Blog Tours for the invite and for organising my e-copy of this book.

Let me show you what its about…

The Demons Beneath by W.D. Jackson-Smart

A detective new to London. A possible serial killer. And a demon?

When a bloody corpse is discovered in a North London park, Detective Inspector Daniel Graves is the man tasked with finding the killer. With no clues and no suspects it seems like a dead end. Then another body turns up and this time it looks like it could be his fault. Has his investigation caused the murderer to strike again? Is he dealing with a serial killer?

As the case gets ever more complicated, a report comes in of another suspicious death but this is nothing like any other Graves has dealt with. All involved are convinced that something supernatural is to blame. A demon. Daniel is no believer but could he be wrong?

With two cases on his shoulders and the truth behind each beyond his grasp, Graves must race against time before both killers, human or otherwise, strike again.

What do you get when a horror writer decides to mix it up and write a crime thriller? Answer = You get The Demons Beneath! And what a cracking read it was as well!

Inspector Daniel Graves (love the surname – very horror-esque sounding!) is still getting used to his new life in London. He is recently transferred from Derbyshire and is not only trying to find his feet in the city but, also with the level and type of crimes. He has two cases land on his desk, one is for a body that has just been discovered. The other is for an exorcism that has gone wrong and the demon being exorcised is supposedly the killer!

With two very different cases, Daniel and his team are stumped. they are constantly looking for a lead or lucky break. there is little evidence to go on and the leads are thin. The team are a great mix and they each bring their own style and personality to the investigation. Pressure from their superiors doesn’t make tasks any easier and this creates a sense of “time is of the essence” to the book and cases.

The author does a cracking job with the storyline and the characters. the mix of the two cases are contrasting even though both are being dealt as murder. The demonology aspect that has been woven into the second of the two cases adds a suspense and chilling eeriness to the story and adds a great twist. The first case balances out the creepiness of the second, as it appears to be a more straightforward.

This is my first time reading anything by this author, and my first impressions are very good. being as this the first book in a series I am looking forward to reading more. My only niggle for the book is Daniel Graves repetitiveness when it comes to women that have caught his eye, yes I understand they have but I didn’t need reminding of it to the extent I did. as I said it is only a little niggle and it didn’t put me off reading the book.

The author has successfully created a wonderful twist on a genre I read quite a lot. I really like the infusion of horror and suspense into the crime thriller style of the investigation. It has a real spooky eerie feeling to the read. I thought it was quite well paced and quite happily read this in a couple of days. I am looking forward to getting to know Graves and his team in future book.

A wonderful crime thriller/ police procedural read that has a good twist and is a little bit different and one I would recommend.

WD Jackson-Smart is a crime and horror/thriller writer from the UK obsessed with all things thrilling.

He has written the bestselling supernatural thriller Red Light, the Hollywood-based horror/thriller Slasher, as well as horror short What’s Yours Is Mine.

His new release Demons, the first in a new London-based crime series featuring Detective Inspector Graves, is out now. Search WD Jackson.

Follow him on Twitter or his Website

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Our Baby Was Born Premature (the same way he was conceived) by Paul Alexander @RunAmok_books #humour #Bookreview

I am delighted to share my thoughts today on this very humorous book about parenting, Our Baby Was Born Premature by Paul Alexander.

My huge thanks to Run Amok Books for sending me a copy of this fab and funny book.

So, let me show you what it is all about…

Our Baby Was Born Premature is a uniquely conceived memoir rendered in “super-tweets.” Begun by the comedian-cum-author as a way to work out the complex and anxious feelings that an expecting/new parent goes through, Alexander offers up fresh insights into the perils and joys of parenthood, ranging from amusing to hilarious to keenly observant to chaotically reflective. It’s page after page of belly laughs for new parents, soon-to-be-parents, and never-wanna-be parents alike.

This is such a funny book and I suppose is kind of like a memoir from the perspective of a first time dad. It had me chuckling so much as I read it and made me feel very thankful that my own children are all gown up and that Grandchildren can be handed back to their parents! I think it is this already experienced and learnt knowledge of parenting myself that made it such an enjoyable read.

The book is laid out in one liners, or short paragraphs of differing lengths, they are quirky observation and interactions from the father. The book is only 168 pages long but I think there was pretty much something on every page that made me either nod knowingly, smirk or chuckle.

This is an American author, so I do admit that there was the odd time that I wasn’t sure what the author was referring to, but it didn’t matter as there was loads of other stuff that other parents will recognise.

I am going to share 3 little snippets that really made me laugh!

“Women have superpowers. Giving birth. Producing food. And what is my superpower? I can pee on bushes.”

“Always feed the baby after playing aeroplane.”

And finally…

“let a four year old use an electric pencil sharpener and all the pencils in your house will be one inch long.”

The quick line format of this book means it is ideal for dipping in and out of, or if you are like me and love a good chuckle, you will want to read it in one sitting. The sentences give enough information for your brain to work out what has happened. The author is a comedian and even before I had realised this I thought, this guy is funny

Overall a very funny book that deals with observations from a fathers point of view. Very entertaining reading and one I would recommend.

Paul Alexander is a comedian who has worked in comedy clubs since the comedy gold rush of ’95 and appeared on MTV, A & E and Comedy Central. He has been published in news papers including The Muskokan and had a song featured on CBC’s ‘As It Happens.’ Paul also worked in film production in Los Angeles for many years and now resides in small town Canada where he runs a pumpkin race every Halloween.


Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share is always appreciated 🙂 xx