Blindsighted by Karin Slaughter #20booksofsummer #bookreview

I am delighted to welcome you to my thoughts on Blindsighted by Karin Slaughter. I own several books by this author and this is the first I have read. This is book #1 in the Grant County series and it was a cracking read. It is #17 in my reading challenge for #20 Books Of Summer.

Let me show you what it is all about…

The first book in Karin Slaughter’s #1 bestselling GRANT COUNTY series.

She was found in the local diner. Brutally murdered. Ritually mutilated.
And she won’t be the last.
___________________

The sleepy town of Heartsdale, Georgia, is jolted into panic when Sara Linton, paediatrician and medical examiner, finds Sibyl Adams dead in the local diner. As well as being viciously raped, Sibyl has been cut: two deep knife wounds form a lethal cross over her stomach. But it’s only once Sara starts to perform the post-mortem that the full extent of the killer’s brutality becomes clear.

Police chief Jeffrey Tolliver – Sara’s ex-husband – is in charge of the investigation, and when a second victim is found, crucified, only a few days later, both Jeffrey and Sara have to face the fact that Sibyl’s murder wasn’t a one-off attack. What they’re dealing with is a seasoned sexual predator. A violent serial killer…

I have to say right from the off that I really, really enjoyed this book and what a fabulous introduction to a “new to me” author!

The synopsis is one that gives a great idea as to what the story is about, not that I read the synopsis until I have finished reading the book! It does give an indication that this story is going to be a bit on the brutal side, and yes it and in such a brilliant way.

Dr. Sara Linton is the medical examiner/ coroner whose main job is a paediatrician. She works for her ex-husband while doing her role as coroner, not ideal but they do still talk to each other. Oh I should mention that her ex is Police Chief Jeffrey Tolliver.

Sara stumbles on the victim in a toilet booth. Sybil has been brutally murdered, and I must add it is quite a bloody affair and as wrong as this sounds… it was so good. It meant that straight away I wanted to know more, the how’s, the why’s and the who’s, it made me impatient and I was addicted straight away.

So with a beginning like that, I knew this was going to be a good book. A great opening with blood, guts, murder and a character I was going to get on with and like. Over the course of the story I got to know Sara a little better, her family, her past and also her relationship with her ex.

The author builds up the story and gradually adds more intrigue and never was I close to working out who was responsible, though I did have the odd idea floating around. The characters fall into various categories, those you will like, those you won’t and those that don’t quite sit right but you don’t know why! I like the way the author littered this story with seeds of doubt, it kept me on my toes and my fingers turning the pages.

Having a main character as a coroner meant I was able to see inside the examination room so to speak, and it was not pleasant but at the same time it was again very good. The descriptions of the bodies and what had happened to them made me shudder and curl my toes up. The investigation was brilliantly paced and move along nicely.

This book could just as easily been called Blindsided rather than Blindsighted and I was the former for most of the story. This author got the balance right with regards to the case, the drama of the personal lives and also the tension and stress in trying to track down the killer.

So as I mentioned, this is the first time of reading anything by this author and what a brilliant book I chose to read. I can definitely see why she is so popular. I am looking forward to reading more in the series as well as the others that she has written. It’s great to find a new author who has lots of already published books out there.

And, as if you really needed me to mention this…. I would Absolutely Recommend Blindsighted!


Book #17 of 20


Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be brilliant 🙂 xx

The Death of Justice by Tony J Forder @TonyJForder @Bloodhoundbook #bookreview

I am absolutely delighted to welcome you to read my thoughts on The Death of Justice by Tony J Forder. This is #5 in the DI Bliss series and I want to say a huge thank you to Heather at Bloodhound Books for arranging for an e-copy of Tony’s latest book.

I am a huge fan of this series and the author, and this latest book is bloody brilliant!

Let me show you what it is all about…

To keep a secret hidden you must bury the truth

One night. Two shootings. Two victims.

When DI Bliss arrives at the scene of the second murder, he recognises the same three-shot pattern as the first. But there is one major difference: the second victim has been decapitated, the head nowhere to be found. When a second headless corpse is discovered the following day, Bliss and his team realise the killer is on a spree – and he’s not done yet.

After Bliss links the killings and forms a task force with officers from Lincolnshire, they uncover further disturbing news: the murders are not the first in the series – there are four more headless victims, and the Lincolnshire team believe they know why. Not only that, they are also convinced that more potential victims are on the killer’s list.

In a race against time to save further loss of life, Bliss constantly finds himself one step behind and chasing shadows. In order to flush out the hired assassin, he and his team have no choice but to put their own lives at risk. But will everyone survive? 

This is the latest in the DI Bliss series, and you know I am going to say that Yes you should read this series in order. There are smaller personal stories that are running through the series, and they are mentioned in the books but obviously are much better when read in order.

Oh Wow, what a book! This for me see’s a real step up for this author, I have always been a fan of his books, but this one just knocks the socks off what I have read by him… so far! This author always provides a good solid read and I have enjoyed reading the developments with the characters and the addictive story lines. For me, The Death of Justice sees this author step things up big time.

The case begins with a shooting, it is then followed by a decapitation. This is only the beginning! Bliss and his team realise that this could be the start of something much bigger and things could spectacularly spiral out of control. There is a sense of not having much time as Bliss and his department have to cross into another county and co-operation is required across the county borders. Bliss has never really been one for tact and diplomacy and is often found stamping on toes within the hierarchy, but this time he is going to have to hold back, well to a certain extent!

The author has definitely ramped up the complexity in the case as Bliss finds himself in an investigation that has him pulled from pillar to post and is struggling to be everywhere he wants to be. Yet while the case is complex for Bliss, it is not for the reader. I found it easy to follow and I like the logical progress the author uses for Bliss.

Bliss is old school and knows about grey areas and experienced in reading people. He is one of those characters that does interact well with his team, they are valued and respected by Bliss and they have a bond that has been built up over time. This is where I back up my statement about reading in order.

As well as the complex case , the author has injected a great pace to this story. There is definitely a “race against time” aspect to the investigation. It adds to the dramatic and tense that is present throughout. The unusual nature of the case means Bliss is given a little more leeway than usual, he has this with the blessing of his superiors. This is the grey area that Bliss seems to thrive in, and he is definitely well placed to think outside the box as far as protocol and procedure is concerned.

This story starts dramatically and ends spectacularly dramatically. I was able to get up to date with the smaller personal stories in the lives of the regular characters, while they are not major storylines and they do fade during the investigation, they make an appearance again at the end. They are poignant and I like them a lot.

In between the main story there is also some chapters from the perspective of another character. Oh my goodness are they chilling and creepy or what! This adds a great psychological suspense to the story and definitely gets the spine tingling as I read these particular chapters.

Emotions… well… Yes Mr Forder you broke me! That means you got it absolutely right! The author mentions in a note at the end of the story about the balance of this story, my floods of tears meant that for me it was right. Yes it was balanced, the investigation is obviously the main focus, but in with that there was drama, suspicion, tension, emotion and complexity and they all have an important part to play.

This is without doubt THE best book I have read by this author. So many things I loved about it and even though there is a sadness it also made sense because not everything is finite and there are things that happen in daily life that is life itself. I also feel that this is a huge step forward in a series I already love and has left me with such a feeling of “WOW that was bloody good!”

I would have happily read this book in one sitting, instead I had to read it over a couple of days, it’s so annoying when you have to work a night shift ad you would rather be sat at home with your head in a book!

This is a book that , as if you need telling at this point, that I would absolutely would Highly Recommend!

Tony J Forder is the author of the critically acclaimed and international bestselling crime thriller series featuring Peterborough based detectives Jimmy Bliss and Penny Chandler. The first four books, Bad to the Bone, The Scent of Guilt, If Fear Wins, and The Reach of Shadows, will be joined on 9 September by The Death of Justice.

Tony’s dark, psychological crime thriller, Degrees of Darkness, featuring ex-detective Frank Rogers, was also published by Bloodhound Books.

Scream Blue Murder was written as a standalone, but even before it was published back in November 2017, he had decided to write the sequel, Cold Winter Sun, which was released on 1 November 2018.

Tony lives with his wife in Peterborough, UK, and is busy working on book six in the DI Bliss series, as well as another novel, Fifteen Coffins. 

Follow tony on his – Website Twitter

See what other Book Bloggers think and check out their stops on the Blog Blitz xx

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be fabulous 🙂 xx

Silent Scream by Angela Marsons #20booksofsummer #bookreview

I am delighted to share my thoughts on Silent Scream by Angela Marsons. This is a series I have been seeing and hearing good things about from other readers. It has taken me a while but I have finally started the series.

Let me show you what it is all about…

Even the darkest secrets can’t stay buried forever …

Five figures gather round a shallow grave. They had all taken turns to dig. An adult sized hole would have taken longer. An innocent life had been taken but the pact had been made. Their secrets would be buried, bound in blood …

Years later, a headmistress is found brutally murdered, the first in a spate of gruesome killings which shock the Black Country.

But when human remains are discovered at a former children’s home, disturbing secrets are also unearthed. D.I. Kim Stone fast realises she’s on the hunt for a twisted individual whose killing spree spans decades.

As the body count rises, Kim needs to stop the murderer before they strike again. But to catch the killer, can Kim confront the demons of her own past before it’s too late?

This author has created a fabulous and feisty character in the form of DI Kim Stone. Along with Stone, there is a brilliant team supporting her. Her main sidekick is Bryant and seems to be a “voice of reason” to Stone’s abrupt, “bull in a china shop” approach. The banter between these two is so good and there is a strong sense of friendship and respect between them. There are strong characters in this story and with this strength there is going to be the odd clash, especially with her superior. Luckily for Stone she delivers results so she does have a bit of leeway.

The case itself is that of the discovery of a body that has been found on a local dig site. These requires a different skill set and a specialist team are called in. I love the way the author has used Bates, one of those brought in, and almost painted a bulls-eye on him for Stone’s sarcasm. It is actually something that is a good thing as this sarcasm is usually when a discussion about a body is due to be dealt with. It kind of breaks the tension before the nitty gritty details about the body takes place.

During the case I was able to learn some interesting stuff about Stone, they came in little snippets that were scattered through the story. I have a feeling she is a complex character from what I have learnt about her so far and I think there is a lot more to come.

This story was one that once I started I had problems putting down. It was immediately engaging and really did keep my attention. There is a good amount of detail in the various aspects of the investigation that for me worked really well and these were balanced wonderfully with the more personal side of Stone’s life-history.

This is a series I am so happy about finally beginning, and the best bit is… there are several more books in the series for me to catch up on.

Silent Scream is a book I would Definitely Recommend!


Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be fabulous 🙂 xx

Nightblind by Ragnar Jonasson #20booksofsummer #bookreview

I am delighted to welcome you to my thoughts on Nightblind by Ragnar Jonasson. This is the 2nd in the Dark Iceland series and it has been around 18 months since I read the first book Snowblind!

Let me show you what Nightblind is all about…

Siglufjörður: an idyllically quiet fishing village on the northernmost tip of Iceland, accessible only via a small mountain tunnel. Ari Thór Arason: a local policeman, whose tumultuous past and uneasy relationships with the villagers continue to haunt him. The peace of this close-knit community is shattered by the murder of a policeman – shot at point-blank range in the dead of night in a deserted house. With a killer on the loose and the dark arctic winter closing in, it falls to Ari Thór to piece together a puzzle that involves tangled local politics, a compromised new mayor, and a psychiatric ward in Reykjavik, where someone is being held against their will. Then a mysterious young woman moves to the area, on the run from something she dare not reveal, and it becomes all too clear that tragic events from the past are weaving a sinister spell that may threaten them all.

Dark, chilling and complex, Nightblind is an extraordinary thriller from an undeniable new talent.

This is set in Siglufjörður, Iceland (I still have trouble pronouncing this one!) and a killer is on the loose, the victim is a local police officer. Ari Thor is called off sick leave to investigate. He doesn’t know much about his dead colleague so Ari Thor has some catching up to do given the length of time he has been off.

this is listed as #2 in the series but, it is set 5 years after Snowblind. There is a sense of things that have happened in those 5 years. On further investigation I have discovered that the series has been published in this order, but it doesn’t follow the chronological order… does that make sense… I do hope so! Given this, I was still able to follow and in fact has left me twitching to read the next book in the series to fill in the intriguing gaps!

The story is faster paced than the first one and at just over 200 pages it is a quick read. this author really does excel at creating a brooding atmosphere. There is the feeling that people are holding things back or are working to their own agenda. The small community seems to know a lot but divulge very little. It adds an extra level of tense suspicion to the story.

There are several things that Ari Thor has to deal with. He needs the help of his old friend and boss, Tomas. While Ari Thor is a more cautious man, Tomas is not, he is blunt and to the point with his questioning and really doesn’t mind ruffling the odd feather or four.

The story has two different styles, there is the main story, then there are pages written in italics. The italic pages are from an anonymous person. I liked this switch between the two styles, it gets the old brain cells clicking and whirring trying to workout the connection between the two. I love that “realisation moment” when things suddenly become clear.

This is another fantastic read and if you are a fan of crime, mystery and noir then this is definitely one that should be on your list.

Nightblind gets a Definitely Recommended from Me!


Many thanks for reading my post, likes and shares are always appreciated 🙂 xx

Book 15 of 20

A Fever In The Blood by Oscar De Muriel #20booksofsummer #bookreview

I am delighted to share my review for A Fever In The Blood by Oscar De Muriel.

This is the second in the McGray and Frey series and it sees the return of the two detectives and there very different approaches in their line of work.

Let’s see what it’s about…

In Edinburgh’s lunatic asylum, a patient escapes as a nurse lays dying. Leading the manhunt are legendary local Detective ‘Nine-Nails’ McGray and Londoner-in-exile Inspector Ian Frey.

Before the murder, the suspect was heard in whispered conversation with a fellow patient—a girl who had been mute for years. What made her suddenly break her silence? And why won’t she talk again? Could the rumours about black magic be more than superstition?

McGray and Frey track a devious psychopath far beyond their jurisdiction, through the worst blizzard in living memory, into the shadow of Pendle Hill—home of the Lancashire witches—where unimaginable danger awaits.

The year is 1889 and the story begins on New Years Day in Edinburgh. Lord Joel Ardglass has escaped from the local asylum and is on the run after murdering a nurse. McGray finds evidence of witchcraft, this is right up his street, and fits into his beliefs in the occult and superstition. Frey is a man of science and believes that there is another explanation.

This is definitely a cat and mouse story and it really tests the McGray and Frey partnership. McGray is especially invested in this case for personal reasons that are explained at the beginning of the story. Frey can see why McGray is so keen to catch Ardglass, and is unsuccessful in trying to convince McGray to see things from a more productive and better thought out approach. McGray is more bull in a china shop type of guy.

Tempers are frayed and tested as Ardglass takes the two on a merry dance from Edinburgh to the infamous Pendle Hill, given it’s reputation and history it ties in well for McGray. As for poor Frey, well, he needs hits wits about him and more of that steely British nerve .

The time and setting lend itself so well to this type of story. It is full of mystery, especially given the involvement of witchcraft. The author has once again built up an atmosphere, that, as I read, I could feel the swirling mists, ominous shadows and felt a chill as I was taken into the cold and bleakly described landscape.

At the end of the story the author gives a few insights into the story, he mentions how his Phd in Chemistry helped him to create some of the dramatic elements to his story.

This is a murder/mystery that has a fabulous Gothic feel to it. If you have read the first, then I think this has a slightly different feel. I is a book I thoroughly enjoyed and left me wondering what the author has in store next for McGray & Frey.

It gets a definitely recommended from Me!

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share is always appreciated 🙂 xx

Book 11 out of 20


Holy Island by LJ Ross #20Booksof summer #BookReview

I am delighted to be sharing my thoughts today on Holy Island by LJ Ross. This is the first book in the DCI Ryan Mystery series. Although I do have a few of this authors books, this is the first one I have read. I am reading this as part of the #20 Books of Summer Reading Challenge and it marks the half point for me.

Let me show you what it’s about…

Detective Chief Inspector Ryan retreats to Holy Island seeking sanctuary when he is forced to take sabbatical leave from his duties as a homicide detective. A few days before Christmas, his peace is shattered and he is thrust back into the murky world of murder when a young woman is found dead amongst the ancient ruins of the nearby Priory.

When former local girl Dr Anna Taylor arrives back on the island as a police consultant, old memories swim to the surface making her confront her difficult past. She and Ryan struggle to work together to hunt a killer who hides in plain sight, while pagan ritual and small-town politics muddy the waters of their investigation.

Holy Island of Lindisfarne provides a wonderful setting for this crime and mystery story. It is accessible by a road at low tide, this gives it a secluded and remote feel. It’s where DCI Ryan has retreated and why he is first on scene when a young girls body is reported. She has been found in the midst of the islands ruins. Given the history of the island a consultant is required, this is where Dr Anna Taylor is called in. She knows the island, she used to live there.

This is a book that has atmosphere, it is enhanced by the setting, the ruins and the history of the area. The island has religious roots as well as pagan ones as well and the author has nicely woven in the later.

I found myself quickly warming to the characters as I got to know them and I liked the initial stubbornness shown by Ryan and Anna at the very beginning. Though as they do have to work together, they do warm to each other.

Because Anna used to live on the island, she appears to be the best choice to consult. Coming back brings up old memories and opens the odd wound. Ryan in contrast is more about the crime and personal issues he has not got time for.

This story is one that at times felt like a cosy mystery, almost like a classic “whodunit”but also has a macabre side given the bloody state of the bodies. It has several clever twists and turns that threw a red herring or two along the way. Easy to follow as there are not a huge cast involved, it also kept me guessing until the conclusion.

A good introduction for a new to me series and one that I am looking forward to progressing further with.

It is one I would recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, alike or share is always appreciated xx

Book 10 of 20

Warlock Holmes – A Study In Brimstone by G.S. Denning #20booksofsummer (7/20) #BookReview

Welcome to my review for Warlock Holmes – A Study in Brimstone by G.S. Denning. This is book number 7 of 20 in the 20 Books of Summer Rading Challenge.

Let me show you what it is all about…

Sherlock Holmes is an unparalleled genius who uses the gift of deduction and reason to solve the most vexing of crimes.

Warlock Holmes, however, is an idiot. A good man, perhaps; a font of arcane power, certainly. But he’s brilliantly dim. Frankly, he couldn’t deduce his way out of a paper bag. The only thing he has really got going for him are the might of a thousand demons and his stalwart flatmate. Thankfully, Dr. Watson is always there to aid him through the treacherous shoals of Victorian propriety… and save him from a gruesome death every now and again.

An imaginative, irreverent and addictive reimagining of the world’s favourite detective, Warlock Holmes retains the charm, tone and feel of the original stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle while finally giving the flat at 221b Baker Street what it’s been missing for all these years: an alchemy table.

Reimagining six stories, this riotous mash-up is a glorious new take on the ever-popular Sherlock Holmes myth, featuring the vampire Inspector Vladislav Lestrade, the ogre Inspector Torg Grogsson, and Dr. Watson, the true detective at 221b. And Sherlock. A warlock.

As you can see from reading the synopsis, this is similar to Sherlock Holmes and yet it is completely different!

Warlock is definitely a unique individual, you could say slightly mad, a little too mysterious and not altogether what you would expect.

This story is entertaining as I discovered the dynamics for this authors version of Holmes and Watson is more of a role reversal. Holmes is not the confident type of detective and in fact it is Watson who, once he gets to grips with the facts, takes the lead.

This is a re-imagined version of Sherlock Holmes, changing the name to Warlock and adding a more supernatural twist to it, actually worked rather well for me. I always think of the original Holmes as being mysterious and open to various thoughts and beliefs, and in some ways this lends itself to the way the author has taken with his version.

This is one of those books that I really enjoyed, although I do expect that it may not appeal to all. The books includes 6 stories and is entertaining reading. It does have the feel of the Conan Doyle original to it and I found myself quite engrossed wondering what on earth was going to happen next.

It is a book I would recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be great 🙂 x

Hudson’s Kill by Paddy Hirsch #Review

I am delighted to be sharing my review for Hudson’s Kill by paddy Hirsch. I recieved a hardback copy of this book via Readers First. This is a historical fiction set in New York in 1803, so let me show you what it is all about…

‘A wild horse-and-carriage ride through early 19th century New York… Meticulously researched, the novel brings the city to life in lurid sensory detail.’ Noel O’Reilly, author of Wrecker

New York, 1803. The expanding city is rife with tension, and violence simmers on every street as black and Irish gangs fight for control. When a young girl is found brutally murdered, Marshal Justy Flanagan must find the killer before a mob takes the law into their own hands.

Kerry O’Toole, Justy’s friend and ally, decides to pursue her own inquiries into the girl’s murder. When they each find their way into a shadowy community on the fringes of the city, Justy and Kerry encounter a treacherous web of political conspiracy and criminal enterprise. As events dangerously escalate, they must fight to save not only the city, but also themselves…

This is a murder mystery read that also has a lot of conspiracy and tension mixed in as well. It is New York in 1803 and Kerry O’Toole finds the body of a young girl a back alley. Justy Flanagan is called in to investigate the identity of the girl and also the killer. Together Justy and Kerry kind of work together, I say kind of because they both want to find the same answers!

This is a book that has a lot going on in it. What I thought was going to be a murder mystery read, which it was by the way, also had gangs, conspiracy, rivalry and, tension. All these components added to the mixing pot that made up New York at the time. People from different, countries with various backgrounds, religious beliefs and traditions all arrived in the area. They all bring their own language and ways of speaking, and this is where I began to notice the research aspect of the book. The speech was very evident from the off as I cam across words that I recognised as being Welsh, Scottish and Irish.

The speech adds to the diversity of the setting and the people who inhabit it. The descriptions of bars, brothels, alleyways and the like bring home the fact that this is not an affluent area. The author has used the tensions to their advantage and played on it, escalating feelings between rivals. In someways this overwhelmed the investigation, but it was also part of the investigation, if you know what I mean. I just felt that the murder had been sidelined a little bit, but, at the same time I know that

This is a good read and even though there were a couple of things I struggled with, I did enjoy it. I thought it was quite a complex story and maybe this is what caught me out as I wasn’t expecting that when I started.

Earlier I mentioned about speech and I was incredibly glad to see a glossary at the end of the book, while there are some terms that I could work out, there were some that had me scratching my head. I love the inclusion of the old languages and phrases.

This is the 2nd book in the series, and as is my usual form I have not read the first one yet! So, I can say that this owrks well as a stand alone but, I would suggest reading in order as there are things mentioned that I assume are from the first book. There is also a dynamic between Just and Kerry that I am curious to know more about. So I will be reading the first book at some point to squash my curiosity.

Hudson’s Kill is an addictive if complex read and I really enjoyed it and would recommend it.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Clear My Name by Paula Daly #damppebblesblogtours #review

I am delighted to welcome you to my review of Clear My Name by Paula Daly. My huge thanks to Emma at Damppebbles Blog Tours for my copy of the book and for my spot on the tour.

And what a book it was…

Innocent?

When Carrie was accused of brutally murdering her husband’s lover, she denied it. She denied it when they arrested her, when they put her in front of a jury, and when they sent her to prison.

Now she’s three years into a fifteen-year sentence, away from the daughter she loves and the life she had built. And she is still denying that she is to blame.

Guilty?

Tess Gilroy has devoted her life to righting wrongs. Through her job for Innocence UK, a charity which takes on alleged miscarriages of justice, she works tirelessly to uncover the truth.

But when she is asked to take Carrie’s case, Tess realises that if she is to help this woman, she must risk uncovering the secrets she has struggled a lifetime to hide…

We’ve all done things we’re not proud of.

Well this was such a tense and suspense filled read. Tess works for Innocence UK, a charity that chooses cases for those wrongly imprisoned. They re-open the case and try to seek justice. Carrie is one of the victims of wrongful imprisonment. She was convicted of killing her husbands mistress, a crime she has always proclaimed her innocence of…

This is set out over three timeline, Now, 4 years ago and also % years ago. Don’t worry the timelines are easy to follow. The Now is focused on the work Tess does, the evidence that will be collected for the appeal. 4 and 5 years ago deal with the period just before the crime and then of Carrie’s arrest and imprisonment.

Alongside the case there is another story line. It is the more personal story of Tess herself. She is an enigma of a character and doesn’t let much escape. She is constantly moving address and the why is something that is gradually revealed.

These two story lines sort of compliment each other and work well. Tess has things she wants to remain hidden. Where as Carrie has to let all her secrets out, but does she, is she holding things back.

The story has a really good pace, not overly fast but none the less I still flew through it. It is what I call a quieter read and by that I mean it is not full of action at every turn. Instead it is well laid out and had a feeling of being quite methodical and this seemed to mirror the way Tess would work gathering evidence.

Even though questions were being answered from the characters in the story, I still had a quiet unease, doubts if you like. Was everything I was being fed, truthful! I like this dramatic sense of tension, it adds suspense to quieter stories and a wonderful sense of atmosphere. By the end I had finally had all answered, though I did feel it wrapped up a little quick, or maybe I didn’t want it to end!

A thoroughly enjoyable read that had drama, human interest, tension and suspense. This is the first book I have read by this author and is a wonderful place to start, I am looking forward to reading her previous books.

It is one I would definitely recommend.

Paula Daly is the critically acclaimed author of six novels. She has been shortlisted for the CWA Gold Dagger for Crime Novel of the Year award, and her books have been developed for the new ITV television series, Deep Water, starring Anna Friel. She was born in Lancashire and lives in the Lake District with her husband, three children, and whippet Skippy.

See what other Book Bloggers thought by checking out their reviews as part of the Blog Tour

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Someone You Know by Olivia Isaac-Henry #20booksofsummer (3/20) #NetGalley #Review

I am delighted ot be sharing my review for Someone You Know by Olivia Isaac-Henry. My thanks to the publisher Avon Books UK for accepting my request to read this book via NetGalley.

I have had this title on my shelf for a while and I have decided to include it in my #20booksofsummer Readin Challenge. This is number 3/20.

Let’s see what it is all about…

You can trust your family, can’t you…?

Tess Piper was fourteen when her adored twin sister Edie disappeared.

She has spent the last twenty years building a life away from her fractured family, desperate to escape the shadow of the past.

Only now she needs to confront the huge hole her sister’s disappearance left in her life, because a body has been found. The police are shining a spotlight on the Piper family. And secrets are about to surface.

After all, it’s common knowledge that more often than not, these crimes are committed by someone close to the victim. Someone they trust. Someone they know…

What really happened to Edie Piper?

For 20 years Tess has not known what had happened to her sister Edie when they were both 14 years old. When Edie’s body is finally discovered it brings with it a lot of uncertainty and loads of unanswered questions. Throughout the story, new questions are asked and most of them are answered.

This story is a back and forth one, alternating between present day and 20 years ago where it builds up a picture of the girls growing up and also of Tess as she is today. Tess and Edie had been close but, as they grew older they started to drift apart as their interests and like started to change. Edie was more outgoing of the two, but Tess found herself more isolated, the odd one out if you like and wanting to hang onto her sisters coat-tails. Tess was more old-fashioned, preferring things to stay as they were, while Edie wanted to discover new things and people.

All families have things that are not shared with their children. Parents don’t discuss their doubts and fears with them, wanting to keep their children’s childhood as happy and carefree as possible. The full details of their childhood only start to emerge as Tess starts to dig into the past and finally starts to discover hidden truths.

This story has a good pace to it and follows the lives of the girls and the key figures in their lives. It is a story that felt more like a murder mystery rather than a crime thriller for me. It is one I enjoyed and I had a character in my head for the culprit and, while I was right in my assumption I did have the odd wobble of doubt and thought I may have misjudged it. For me, this didn’t take away any enjoyment of the story, it is about the journey and the reason behind the truth rather than who was responsible.

It is one I would recommend!

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be great 🙂 xx