Warlock Holmes – A Study In Brimstone by G.S. Denning #20booksofsummer (7/20) #BookReview

Welcome to my review for Warlock Holmes – A Study in Brimstone by G.S. Denning. This is book number 7 of 20 in the 20 Books of Summer Rading Challenge.

Let me show you what it is all about…

Sherlock Holmes is an unparalleled genius who uses the gift of deduction and reason to solve the most vexing of crimes.

Warlock Holmes, however, is an idiot. A good man, perhaps; a font of arcane power, certainly. But he’s brilliantly dim. Frankly, he couldn’t deduce his way out of a paper bag. The only thing he has really got going for him are the might of a thousand demons and his stalwart flatmate. Thankfully, Dr. Watson is always there to aid him through the treacherous shoals of Victorian propriety… and save him from a gruesome death every now and again.

An imaginative, irreverent and addictive reimagining of the world’s favourite detective, Warlock Holmes retains the charm, tone and feel of the original stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle while finally giving the flat at 221b Baker Street what it’s been missing for all these years: an alchemy table.

Reimagining six stories, this riotous mash-up is a glorious new take on the ever-popular Sherlock Holmes myth, featuring the vampire Inspector Vladislav Lestrade, the ogre Inspector Torg Grogsson, and Dr. Watson, the true detective at 221b. And Sherlock. A warlock.

As you can see from reading the synopsis, this is similar to Sherlock Holmes and yet it is completely different!

Warlock is definitely a unique individual, you could say slightly mad, a little too mysterious and not altogether what you would expect.

This story is entertaining as I discovered the dynamics for this authors version of Holmes and Watson is more of a role reversal. Holmes is not the confident type of detective and in fact it is Watson who, once he gets to grips with the facts, takes the lead.

This is a re-imagined version of Sherlock Holmes, changing the name to Warlock and adding a more supernatural twist to it, actually worked rather well for me. I always think of the original Holmes as being mysterious and open to various thoughts and beliefs, and in some ways this lends itself to the way the author has taken with his version.

This is one of those books that I really enjoyed, although I do expect that it may not appeal to all. The books includes 6 stories and is entertaining reading. It does have the feel of the Conan Doyle original to it and I found myself quite engrossed wondering what on earth was going to happen next.

It is a book I would recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be great 🙂 x

Hudson’s Kill by Paddy Hirsch #Review

I am delighted to be sharing my review for Hudson’s Kill by paddy Hirsch. I recieved a hardback copy of this book via Readers First. This is a historical fiction set in New York in 1803, so let me show you what it is all about…

‘A wild horse-and-carriage ride through early 19th century New York… Meticulously researched, the novel brings the city to life in lurid sensory detail.’ Noel O’Reilly, author of Wrecker

New York, 1803. The expanding city is rife with tension, and violence simmers on every street as black and Irish gangs fight for control. When a young girl is found brutally murdered, Marshal Justy Flanagan must find the killer before a mob takes the law into their own hands.

Kerry O’Toole, Justy’s friend and ally, decides to pursue her own inquiries into the girl’s murder. When they each find their way into a shadowy community on the fringes of the city, Justy and Kerry encounter a treacherous web of political conspiracy and criminal enterprise. As events dangerously escalate, they must fight to save not only the city, but also themselves…

This is a murder mystery read that also has a lot of conspiracy and tension mixed in as well. It is New York in 1803 and Kerry O’Toole finds the body of a young girl a back alley. Justy Flanagan is called in to investigate the identity of the girl and also the killer. Together Justy and Kerry kind of work together, I say kind of because they both want to find the same answers!

This is a book that has a lot going on in it. What I thought was going to be a murder mystery read, which it was by the way, also had gangs, conspiracy, rivalry and, tension. All these components added to the mixing pot that made up New York at the time. People from different, countries with various backgrounds, religious beliefs and traditions all arrived in the area. They all bring their own language and ways of speaking, and this is where I began to notice the research aspect of the book. The speech was very evident from the off as I cam across words that I recognised as being Welsh, Scottish and Irish.

The speech adds to the diversity of the setting and the people who inhabit it. The descriptions of bars, brothels, alleyways and the like bring home the fact that this is not an affluent area. The author has used the tensions to their advantage and played on it, escalating feelings between rivals. In someways this overwhelmed the investigation, but it was also part of the investigation, if you know what I mean. I just felt that the murder had been sidelined a little bit, but, at the same time I know that

This is a good read and even though there were a couple of things I struggled with, I did enjoy it. I thought it was quite a complex story and maybe this is what caught me out as I wasn’t expecting that when I started.

Earlier I mentioned about speech and I was incredibly glad to see a glossary at the end of the book, while there are some terms that I could work out, there were some that had me scratching my head. I love the inclusion of the old languages and phrases.

This is the 2nd book in the series, and as is my usual form I have not read the first one yet! So, I can say that this owrks well as a stand alone but, I would suggest reading in order as there are things mentioned that I assume are from the first book. There is also a dynamic between Just and Kerry that I am curious to know more about. So I will be reading the first book at some point to squash my curiosity.

Hudson’s Kill is an addictive if complex read and I really enjoyed it and would recommend it.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

A Week off and Days out! #Cornwall #NationalTrust #LocalEvents

So, as I mentioned in my weekly book wrap up post, I have finally got around to sorting out the photos I took during my during my week off work. Me and He (Alan) stayed at home and had days out, it was easier than arranging for someone to look after the 2 dogs and 3 geese.

The week started with the weather forecast not bring the best of news! A Yellow weather warning for wind and rain, so typical 😂 So a couple of days on decorating and the obligatory and never ending weeding was on the cards! Although I did have a little help with the weeding! I finally finished the painting the front room. Alan used to work with Shire horses years ago when he was a tacker, the fascination of these gentle giants has stayed with him over the years, hence all the Shire Horse ornaments.


The first Wednesday in our village means one thing… OX ROAST! It is a day where I stay home and leave the car parked, if I don’t I wont get parked later as visitors and locals come to the village. The Ox Roast is a fundraiser by our local St. Keverne Band. The Band plays a range of music from the traditional marches to more modern arrangements… I have to say that their medley of Queen songs was great! There are various stalls and as the village has 2 , yes 2 pubs, so not wanting to dehydrate, I did partake of a couple of pints! 😋😁This was the 59th Ox Roast and possibly the last to be held on a Wednesday, next year will see the move to a Saturday.

So a few pics from the day, the setting up in the morning and also of the local church than has a dominating presence across the square.

Yes that might be a random photo of a bag of candy floss and a shopping bag, but did you happen to spot the second hand book stall… yes every year that is my first port of call 😍 I suppose you nosy buggers Book Bloggers and readers want to see what I bought!

As the day went on, the crowds increase and by the end of the evening we were treated to a fabulous AC/DC tribute group who were fantastic! Sorry not the best photo of the that act because the spotlights played havoc with camera on my phone 😕


My next day out was to a local National Trust location, it is one of those places that is off the beaten track and has no facilities, just a car park! It is Poltesco Serpentine Works that has the derelict shells of buildings. It stands at Carleon Cove, a small pebble and rock cove that is a short walk from the car park through a small woodland. It is on the SW Coast path and does not attract the huge number of visitors, so is ideal so sit and listen to the waves and chill! It’s hard to believe that these were taken when we had a Yellow weather warning for 50-60 mph winds and heavy rain! Being on the east side of The Lizard Peninsular does have it’s advantages.


Our next day out was to another National Trust Property, this time to Gendurgan Gardens. A walk down through the gardens to sit on Durgan beach with a hot cuppa watching the world go by, before the trek back up again. While Alan is not a great fan of gardens, he did enjoy this one and enjoyed walking off his Sunday roast 😊


While out and about I did spot a couple of things that made me chuckle. A brilliant card and some coat hooks…

Well, that’s the lot. It has been fun to sort through. A really good week with plenty to do. Unfortunately Monday came round far too quickly and I had a 6 hour training course followed 4 hours later by a night-shift… reality and normality landed with a bump 😂

Thanks for reading my post, I hope you enjoyed it too!

Take care, Yvonne xx

Meet Me In Monaco by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb #Review

I am absolutely delighted to be sharing my thoughts with you all today for Meet Me In Monaco by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb. This is such a stunning story that I absolutely fell in love with.

I bought a copy for my kindle, but I am also going to get a paperback when it is published at the beginning of September, it’s that good!

Let’s see what it is all about…

Set in the 1950s against the backdrop of Grace Kelly’s whirlwind romance and glamourous wedding to Prince Rainier of Monaco, New York Times bestselling author Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb take the reader on an evocative sun-drenched journey along the Côte d’Azur in this page-turning novel of passion, fate, and second-chances.

Movie stars and paparazzi flock to Cannes for the glamorous film festival, but Grace Kelly, the biggest star of all, wants only to escape from the flash-bulbs. When struggling perfumer Sophie Duval shelters Miss Kelly in her boutique, fending off a persistent British press photographer, James Henderson, a bond is forged between the two women and sets in motion a chain of events that stretches across thirty years of friendship, love, and tragedy.

James Henderson cannot forget his brief encounter with Sophie Duval. Despite his guilt at being away from his daughter, he takes an assignment to cover the wedding of the century, sailing with Grace Kelly’s wedding party on the SS Constitution from New York. In Monaco, as wedding fever soars and passions and tempers escalate, James and Sophie—like Princess Grace—must ultimately decide what they are prepared to give up for love.

What an absolutely brilliant read this was. Set in the 1950’s of Monaco, it has a wonderful atmosphere in the era of Grace Kelly and her meeting with Prince Rainier. The authors have blended a little fact with the fiction to create a stunning and highly addictive story.

The setting is wonderful adding a little of luxury of the country, with the film star and life style of the iconic and well known film star Grace Kelly.

I was introduced to perfumer Sophie Duval and photographer James Henderson. This happens as Grace seeks sanctuary in Sophie’s shop trying to avoid the press and photographers. Over the course of the story that follows I gradually got to know more about the friendship that forms between Sophie and James. They just never quite seem to get together at the right time, there always seems to be something that gets in the way.

For James, photography is his passion, but snapping celebs is not what he wants to do. He wants scenery and locations, not easy when there is someone at home that also needs his time.

Sophie is being pressured to sell her business, a business that she took over from her father. The business is in her bones and her soul, it is everything that makes her who she is.

This is such a stunning story and the authors have captured the feel and atmosphere so well. The visuals that they have conjured up made it so easy for me to imagine so many things from, dresses to scenery they made it seem effortless. There is a romantic tension that builds up between Sophie and James, and as much as I wanted to see them together early on I was glad that the authors kept pulling them apart.

The emotion of the story was something that gradually built up and by the end of the book the dam finally burst. I was in tears and not for the reason that you are probably thinking!

There are notes at the end of the book that gave some extra’s into the life of Grace Kelly as well as about perfumes and how the book came to be. I must admit I did spend quite a bit of time after finishing the book, Googling Grace and her life, I wasn’t quite ready to turn the last page on Grace at that moment and needed to read more about this beautiful lady.

This is a book that I would absolutely recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be fabulous 🙂 xx

Before the Rains by Dinah Jefferies #20booksofsummer #BookReview

I am delighted to share my review with you for Before the Rains by Dinah Jeffries. A historical fiction/romance set in 1930 India. This is one of my picks for the #20Books of Summer Reading Challenge and is number 7/20.

Let’s have a look and see what it is all about…

A romantic, heart-wrenching tale of love against the odds from the Number One Sunday Times bestselling author

1930, Rajputana, India. Since her husband’s death, 28-year-old photojournalist Eliza’s only companion has been her camera. When the British Government send her to an Indian princely state to photograph the royal family, she’s determined to make a name for herself.

But when Eliza arrives at the palace she meets Jay, the Prince’s handsome, brooding brother. While Eliza awakens Jay to the poverty of his people, he awakens her to the injustices of British rule. Soon Jay and Eliza find they have more in common than they think. But their families – and society – think otherwise. Eventually they will have to make a choice between doing what’s expected, or following their hearts. . .

This is my first time reading a book by this author and after reading Before the Rains, it will not be my last time.

Eliza is a photographer who gets a year-long job opportunity to take photographs of the Royal Family in Rajputana, India in 1930. It is a chance for her to hone her craft and hope to arrange an exhibition that could lead to further work.

The story is that mainly of Eliza. It tells of her childhood growing up in India as part of the British occupation. After leaving India after the death of her father she has the chance to return and it is on this return that she photographs.

At the palace, she meets several members of the family including Jay the Prince and next-in-line to the throne. Jay is more progressive in his thinking than other members of his family, though he still holds firm to some traditions. Jay and Eliza gradually get to know each other and he almost takes her under his wing, showing her things outside of the palace that she would otherwise not have seen. This friendship slowly grows and a more romantic aspect, it is not a sudden thing, instead, it has a tension that smoulders.

The author has some fabulous scenery descriptions and she describes the colours and sights to a point that I could imagine what she was explaining. Details of culture, religion and, traditions are touched upon and these are heartbreaking and also real eye-openers. It adds to the suspicion around Eliza she being not only British but also a widow. Speaking of suspicion, it is everywhere in the palace and outside of the palace and from various sources. The tension of the time is brought out very well, as India wants the British to be gone and they can rule themselves again.

This is a very immersive and a compelling book to read. I did think that it wrapped up a little too conveniently but saying that it did give a satisfying ending. Along with friendships and liaisons, there is also a good amount of drama, tension, conspiracy and heartbreak. The clash of culture between India and Britain is dealt with well and gives an impression from both sides. Another large clash is that of the social classes, from the extreme poverty to the extreme opulence of those in the palace.

This is a really good read that I found quite addictive, and it is one I would definitely recommend to readers who like historical fiction and romance.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be great 🙂 xx

My Week In Books (w/e 11th Aug) #BookNews #MeAndMyBooks

Welcome once again to another round up of bookish news. I do want to say a HUGE thanks you to those who shared my midweek Blog Tour review, it was greatly appreciated. Me and He have both been off work for the week so social media definitely took a back seat. I will sort out a separate post with photo’s of the places we went a bit later in the week 🙂

So let’s have a look at the books I read shall we?..


In last weeks post I was still reading The July Girls, well I finished it and WOW! In case you have not seen it this is what it is all about…

The July Girls by Phoebe Locke

Every year, on the same night in July, a woman is taken from the streets of London; snatched by a killer who moves through the city like a ghost. 

Addie has a secret. On the morning of her tenth birthday, four bombs were detonated across the capital. That night her dad came home covered in blood. She thought he was hurt in the attacks – but then her sister Jessie found a missing woman’s purse hidden in his room. Jessie says they mustn’t tell. She says there’s nothing to worry about. But when she takes a job looking after the woman’s baby daughter, Addie starts to realise that her big sister doesn’t always tell her the whole story. And that the secrets they’re keeping may start costing lives…


Next up…

A Fever In The Blood by Oscar de Muriel

This is the 2nd in the series and is feels different to the first. It is more mysterious as the duo of McGray and Frey are involved in a chase that has personal connection for McGray as they end up in Lancashire at the notorious Pendle Hil! A mystery that oozes atmosphere and is set in 1889. This is number 11 of my #20Books of Summer reading list, and I really must get my arse into gear and get the reviews wrote up!


Next is a book that is not on my summer reading list, but I could not resist it…

My Lemon Grove Summer by Jo Thomas

Last year I read my first Jo Thomas book and that was Sunset over the Cherry Orchard and I absolutely adored it. This was why when I saw My Lemon Grove Summer I had to buy it and read it. Sicilian sun, stunning setting, lemon groves… aaah take me there! A fabulous summer read.


I was very fortunate to win a Signed copy of my next book as well as an Audio CD and it has sat on my shelf for far too long…

The Good Doctor of Warsaw by Elisabeth Gifford

What can I say about this book! It is a beautifully written and absolutely heartbreaking read. I am still trying to find the words to describe what a wonderful read this was. If you have not read it yet, then please consider getting a copy!


I am currently reading a book that was sent out via the publisher for me to review…

Raven’s Wind by Steve Hutton

I am only a few chapters in and I’m really enjoying this… here is what the synopsis says…

Raven’s Wand sees two opposing secret societies waging a war of belief behind the skin of Victorian Britain. One uses magic to heal the world, while the other twists it into abominations and war machines. It is 1886 and a battle is about to be waged; Knight Superior Krast of the Illuminata is prepared for victory but fate is not wholly on his side. Many years later, the survivors of that dreadful day will meet again. Kolfinnia has a great task set before her and, with the aid of the Raven wand, she dares more than she ever dreamed possible. A tale of two clashing worlds. The world of Kolfinnia and those who wish to eliminate her and all of her kind. Raven’s Wand is Book 1 in The Dark Raven Chronicles. Book 2: Flowers of Fate will be published Autumn 2016.


Well that is me done for this week, hope you all had a great reading week.

All the best, Yvonne xx

Clear My Name by Paula Daly #damppebblesblogtours #review

I am delighted to welcome you to my review of Clear My Name by Paula Daly. My huge thanks to Emma at Damppebbles Blog Tours for my copy of the book and for my spot on the tour.

And what a book it was…

Innocent?

When Carrie was accused of brutally murdering her husband’s lover, she denied it. She denied it when they arrested her, when they put her in front of a jury, and when they sent her to prison.

Now she’s three years into a fifteen-year sentence, away from the daughter she loves and the life she had built. And she is still denying that she is to blame.

Guilty?

Tess Gilroy has devoted her life to righting wrongs. Through her job for Innocence UK, a charity which takes on alleged miscarriages of justice, she works tirelessly to uncover the truth.

But when she is asked to take Carrie’s case, Tess realises that if she is to help this woman, she must risk uncovering the secrets she has struggled a lifetime to hide…

We’ve all done things we’re not proud of.

Well this was such a tense and suspense filled read. Tess works for Innocence UK, a charity that chooses cases for those wrongly imprisoned. They re-open the case and try to seek justice. Carrie is one of the victims of wrongful imprisonment. She was convicted of killing her husbands mistress, a crime she has always proclaimed her innocence of…

This is set out over three timeline, Now, 4 years ago and also % years ago. Don’t worry the timelines are easy to follow. The Now is focused on the work Tess does, the evidence that will be collected for the appeal. 4 and 5 years ago deal with the period just before the crime and then of Carrie’s arrest and imprisonment.

Alongside the case there is another story line. It is the more personal story of Tess herself. She is an enigma of a character and doesn’t let much escape. She is constantly moving address and the why is something that is gradually revealed.

These two story lines sort of compliment each other and work well. Tess has things she wants to remain hidden. Where as Carrie has to let all her secrets out, but does she, is she holding things back.

The story has a really good pace, not overly fast but none the less I still flew through it. It is what I call a quieter read and by that I mean it is not full of action at every turn. Instead it is well laid out and had a feeling of being quite methodical and this seemed to mirror the way Tess would work gathering evidence.

Even though questions were being answered from the characters in the story, I still had a quiet unease, doubts if you like. Was everything I was being fed, truthful! I like this dramatic sense of tension, it adds suspense to quieter stories and a wonderful sense of atmosphere. By the end I had finally had all answered, though I did feel it wrapped up a little quick, or maybe I didn’t want it to end!

A thoroughly enjoyable read that had drama, human interest, tension and suspense. This is the first book I have read by this author and is a wonderful place to start, I am looking forward to reading her previous books.

It is one I would definitely recommend.

Paula Daly is the critically acclaimed author of six novels. She has been shortlisted for the CWA Gold Dagger for Crime Novel of the Year award, and her books have been developed for the new ITV television series, Deep Water, starring Anna Friel. She was born in Lancashire and lives in the Lake District with her husband, three children, and whippet Skippy.

See what other Book Bloggers thought by checking out their reviews as part of the Blog Tour

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

My Week In Books (w/e 4th Aug) #MeAndMyBooks

Another week has been and gone! This has been an interesting week as well. It started off as any normal week would then finished a little chaotic but hey, it keeps things interesting.

Me and my husband both have a week off work. We are not going away anywhere instead we are having days out. One of those days out was to Lanhydrock House, it is near Bodmin in Cornwall, just over an hours drive from where we live. Neither of us have been before and we spent several hours walking round the house and grounds. Here are some photo’s

I suppose I should mention books as that is what I am here for…

So to what I read this week…

Hudson’s Kill by Paddy Hirsch

This is a historical fiction set in 1803 New York. It is a murder mystery and conspiracy novel. I really enjoyed this book and as much as it was about discovering the identity of the killer it was also aboiut tensions between the different gangs and nationalities that made up the inhabitants of the area. New York was a mixing pot of nationalities and sometimes that pot simmered and at others it boiled over. Review to follow.


Warlock Holmes – A Study in Brimstone by G.S. Denning

The caption on the front of this book just about sums the story up well ” Sherlock Holmes is a genius – Warlock Holmes is something else…” Set out as Watson’s diary entries, this book reads as short stories, it is definitley different to Sherlock, in fact the roles that Warlock AND Watson play are very different. This is a fun read and was enjoyable. This was one from my list of #20 Books of Summer Reading Challenge.


Jacob’s Colours by Lindsay Hawdon

Well what can I say about this book… it is STUNNING and HEARTBREAKIINGLY BEAUTIFUL ! It is the story of Jacob and the plight of the Roma, or Gypsies that were persecuted in WWII. The persecution of the Jews by Hitler is something we are all aware of . Something I had not thought about were the other minority races that would have been persecuted in the same way and this book has certainly rectified that and opened my eyes to their suffering. This is simply a book that will stay with me for a very long time.


Her Last Secret

Her Last Secret by Barbara Copperthwaite

I have read earlier books by this author and really enjoyed them, this one however is even better and for me is beyond awesome! The deviousness that has been injected into the story is chilling. There is a saying that goes along the lines of ” You never know what goes on behind closed doors” The secrets behind those doors makes such compelling reading. It is a fabulous book and the ending…well… read it for yourself.


Holy Island by LJ Ross

This is my first Louise Ross book and I think I have just found a series that I am going to really enjoy. This was a wonderful book that uses the backdrop of The Holy Island of Lindisfarne, Northumberland. Only being accessable twice a day as the tide goes out, it gives a twist on an isolted community. An interesting and enjoyable read and this is also one of my #20Books.


Currently Reading…

The July Girls by Pheobie Locke

I should be reading more of my #20Booksof Summer list, but when I got this one I had to read it. I have seen many reviews about it and they have been favourable to say the least. I am a third of the way through and I am intrigued, nervous and can’t wait to sit down and finish it.


Now as I mentioned my and He are both on holiday for a week. This means I won’t be around much as we are having quality time together having days out as well as getting caught up on the odd jobs. So I apologise if I don’t get to share the amount of posts I normally would as I am only popping in and out.

I hope you all have a fabulous week 😘

Sunshine and Sweet Peas in Nightingale Sqaure by Heidi Swain #20booksofsummer #BookReview

I am delighted ot be sharing my review for Sunshine and Sweet Peas in Nightingale Square by Heidi Swain.

This is the 6th book I have read in the #20 Books of Summer Reading Challange. So, lets have a look and see what it is about…

Kate is on the run from her almost-divorced husband who is determined to have her back, and she has found the perfect place to hide… a little cottage on Nightingale Square in Norwich, far away from her old life in London. But the residents of Nightingale Square don’t take no for an answer, and Kate soon finds herself pulled into a friendship with Lisa, her bossy but lovely new neighbour.

Within a matter of days Kate is landed with the job of campaigning the council to turn the green into a community garden, meanwhile all the residents of Nightingale Square are horrified to discover that the Victorian mansion house on the other side of the square has been bought by developers. But when all hope is lost, the arrival of a handsome stranger is sure to turn things around! 

Heidi Swain is the perfect summer read – you’ll want to find your own green space, stretch out in the sun and dive into life at Nightingale Square.

After seperating from her husband, and trying to lie low, Kate decides to move into an old cottage in Nightingale Square. It’s ideally situated and puts distance between herself and her ex-husband and also her mother. Nightingale Square is a lovely secluded area where she can just be herself and be by herself. Well, that was her plan, the thing is, is that Nightingale Square is a friendly and welcoming area and it’s residents don’t take no for an answer when it comes to getting to know you and getting you involved!

I love the idea of this square, friendly neighbours, an area with history and a warm generous community spirit. Heidi Swain has created a and conjured a wonderful setting without a doubt. She had me hooked from the first few pages.

Kate has had past problems and believes that moving somewhere new will help. But we readers all know that running away from problems doesn’t solve them. Kate is an old romantic who believes that once you have loved and lost, you will never love again! As she has left her husband that’s it as far as she is concerned.

The square is perfect for Kate as the history of it appeals to the antique dealer and history buff in her. There is a main house that dominates the square, but it is due for redevelopment and the new owners will most likely pull it down. The sense of community spirit just oozes from the pages as does the tense romance that hovers in the air. But as things start to heat up along comes a spanner to be thrown into the mix.

This is a wonderful book that is perfect for summer reading. It has drama and tension of the romantic kind as well as friendships and misunderstandings. It is a book I would happily and absolutely recommend to readers.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be fabulous 🙂 xx