My Week In Books (w/e 18th Aug) #MeAndMyBooks #BookNews

Someone please tell me that I have overslept by a couple of months! This is August and not October, I am right aren’t I? To be fair though, the weather is not too bad, it’s still mild and I am still in my shorts, though getting wet legs when I walk to work I not too keen on. But in the grand scale of things it could be a lot worse.

I have been back to work for a week and already booked my next week off, not that I am too eager to take time off work or anything. It’s just nice to know that I have a week to look forward to in a couple of months time.

So down to the books I read and received this week, because let’s be honest that is what you are here for 😂


Last week I had just started to read this one…

Raven’s Wind by Steve Hutton

When I started it I was really enjoying it. By the time I had finished it, I wanted to read the next one! I really, really enjoyed this one. It is a fantasy set in 1886 Britain and the author has mixed in a fantasy storyline that kind of feels right for the time. Witches, dragons, occult and superstition are the main themes, and I have to say that I could actually prnounce the names. Often I find myself struggling with this, but not with this one! It’s a good verses evil style story that is very much about the past coming up against progress.


Next up was…

Under a Cornish Sky by Liz Fenwick

This is now the second book I have read by this author , and the second book I have adored. The story is set in Cornwall around the Helford River and Falmouth, an area I know well, as does the author. Liz has a fabulous way with words when she describes her settings and this story is all about family secrets, history, pride and acceptance. A fabulous story that kept me captivated right the way through


From Cornwall I then went to Iceland…

Night Bond by Ragnar Jonasson

I have a real soft spot for this author and find that he creates a fabulous sense of foreboding and atmosphere with his books. This is the 2nd in the Dark Iceland series and the setting is the quiet fishing village of Siglufjörður. Ari Thor is looking into the shooting of a fellow police officer, in a small village everybody has something to hide and it seems that some may have their own agenda. A fabulously addictive read and ideal for those who love Icelandic Noir.


My next book was a different genre completely and I read…

Jennifer Brown Moving On by Angie Lanley

This is the second book I have read about Jennifer Brown, the first was fabulous and had me chuckling, this one is better again and I adored it. Jennifer Brown is amazing, I would recommend reading the first book “Jennifer Browns Journey” as it gives a brilliant introduction to this fabulous character.


CURRENTLY READING…

I have yet to start this book at the time of writing this post, but I am finally starting the Angela Marsons series, I have not read any of her books and I am really looking forward to taking my first step. I have seen so many other Book Bloggers raving about them that I could not resist.


Books recieved / bought…

I have had a very lucky couple of weeks with entering competitions for Giveaways on other peoples blogs and received some corkers in the post…

I bought a copy of Ronnie Turners book Lies Between Us, I have a copy on kindle and wanted a paperback but somehow forgot to pre-order it. Ronnie shared a post on Facebook and Twitter about her book being available on Amazon, so it prompted me to get myself into gear and buy mine.

Competition wins were…

A signed copy of Dead & Talking by Des Burkinshaw, the synopsis mentions this being “A dark comic, twisty, supernatural thriller in which everyone’s a sceptic” it sounds interesting and definitely intriguing and appeals to me a lot.

Another signed copy… I Can’t Tell You Why by Elaine Robertson North. This is listed under contemporary romance, and from the synopsis it is about mistakes made and an affair. It has some good reviews on Amazon and again is one that is right up my street.

Then there is Thomas Edison by David Boyle. Thomas Edison is someone that I know some things about, but not a lot. This kind of makes him interesting to me so I am looking forward to reading this Biography.

and…

yes there is one more that isn’t in the photo. It’s because it is a digital win…

Bridging the Gulf by Malcolm Hollingdrake

This is a story about Roy Hanna and his return from the Gulf. This novel is about how life has to carry on, it has mentions of Gulf War Syndrome and the struggles that are made. Again another book that sounds very interesting.


Reading Updates…

So, how am I getting on with my #20Books of Summer Reading Challenge? well better than getting the reviews written and posted up… I am up to 15 out of 20 that I have read, but only posted reviews for the first 7 🙄 hopefully I will get caught up soon with the reviewing side of this soon.

As for Goodreads, I am informed that I have read 136 books, this puts me 10 ahead of schedule, I only wish my review rate was that good 🤣

Netgalley stats… yeah I am ignoring that for a moment… I have more in the “older than 3 months” again I need to get sorted with those as well.

Right then, that’s me done for another week. I hope you all have an amazing week, and for those of you with children, take a deep breath… it’s not long till the little darlings go back to school 😉

Take Care, Yvonne xx

Warlock Holmes – A Study In Brimstone by G.S. Denning #20booksofsummer (7/20) #BookReview

Welcome to my review for Warlock Holmes – A Study in Brimstone by G.S. Denning. This is book number 7 of 20 in the 20 Books of Summer Rading Challenge.

Let me show you what it is all about…

Sherlock Holmes is an unparalleled genius who uses the gift of deduction and reason to solve the most vexing of crimes.

Warlock Holmes, however, is an idiot. A good man, perhaps; a font of arcane power, certainly. But he’s brilliantly dim. Frankly, he couldn’t deduce his way out of a paper bag. The only thing he has really got going for him are the might of a thousand demons and his stalwart flatmate. Thankfully, Dr. Watson is always there to aid him through the treacherous shoals of Victorian propriety… and save him from a gruesome death every now and again.

An imaginative, irreverent and addictive reimagining of the world’s favourite detective, Warlock Holmes retains the charm, tone and feel of the original stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle while finally giving the flat at 221b Baker Street what it’s been missing for all these years: an alchemy table.

Reimagining six stories, this riotous mash-up is a glorious new take on the ever-popular Sherlock Holmes myth, featuring the vampire Inspector Vladislav Lestrade, the ogre Inspector Torg Grogsson, and Dr. Watson, the true detective at 221b. And Sherlock. A warlock.

As you can see from reading the synopsis, this is similar to Sherlock Holmes and yet it is completely different!

Warlock is definitely a unique individual, you could say slightly mad, a little too mysterious and not altogether what you would expect.

This story is entertaining as I discovered the dynamics for this authors version of Holmes and Watson is more of a role reversal. Holmes is not the confident type of detective and in fact it is Watson who, once he gets to grips with the facts, takes the lead.

This is a re-imagined version of Sherlock Holmes, changing the name to Warlock and adding a more supernatural twist to it, actually worked rather well for me. I always think of the original Holmes as being mysterious and open to various thoughts and beliefs, and in some ways this lends itself to the way the author has taken with his version.

This is one of those books that I really enjoyed, although I do expect that it may not appeal to all. The books includes 6 stories and is entertaining reading. It does have the feel of the Conan Doyle original to it and I found myself quite engrossed wondering what on earth was going to happen next.

It is a book I would recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be great 🙂 x

Meet Me In Monaco by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb #Review

I am absolutely delighted to be sharing my thoughts with you all today for Meet Me In Monaco by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb. This is such a stunning story that I absolutely fell in love with.

I bought a copy for my kindle, but I am also going to get a paperback when it is published at the beginning of September, it’s that good!

Let’s see what it is all about…

Set in the 1950s against the backdrop of Grace Kelly’s whirlwind romance and glamourous wedding to Prince Rainier of Monaco, New York Times bestselling author Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb take the reader on an evocative sun-drenched journey along the Côte d’Azur in this page-turning novel of passion, fate, and second-chances.

Movie stars and paparazzi flock to Cannes for the glamorous film festival, but Grace Kelly, the biggest star of all, wants only to escape from the flash-bulbs. When struggling perfumer Sophie Duval shelters Miss Kelly in her boutique, fending off a persistent British press photographer, James Henderson, a bond is forged between the two women and sets in motion a chain of events that stretches across thirty years of friendship, love, and tragedy.

James Henderson cannot forget his brief encounter with Sophie Duval. Despite his guilt at being away from his daughter, he takes an assignment to cover the wedding of the century, sailing with Grace Kelly’s wedding party on the SS Constitution from New York. In Monaco, as wedding fever soars and passions and tempers escalate, James and Sophie—like Princess Grace—must ultimately decide what they are prepared to give up for love.

What an absolutely brilliant read this was. Set in the 1950’s of Monaco, it has a wonderful atmosphere in the era of Grace Kelly and her meeting with Prince Rainier. The authors have blended a little fact with the fiction to create a stunning and highly addictive story.

The setting is wonderful adding a little of luxury of the country, with the film star and life style of the iconic and well known film star Grace Kelly.

I was introduced to perfumer Sophie Duval and photographer James Henderson. This happens as Grace seeks sanctuary in Sophie’s shop trying to avoid the press and photographers. Over the course of the story that follows I gradually got to know more about the friendship that forms between Sophie and James. They just never quite seem to get together at the right time, there always seems to be something that gets in the way.

For James, photography is his passion, but snapping celebs is not what he wants to do. He wants scenery and locations, not easy when there is someone at home that also needs his time.

Sophie is being pressured to sell her business, a business that she took over from her father. The business is in her bones and her soul, it is everything that makes her who she is.

This is such a stunning story and the authors have captured the feel and atmosphere so well. The visuals that they have conjured up made it so easy for me to imagine so many things from, dresses to scenery they made it seem effortless. There is a romantic tension that builds up between Sophie and James, and as much as I wanted to see them together early on I was glad that the authors kept pulling them apart.

The emotion of the story was something that gradually built up and by the end of the book the dam finally burst. I was in tears and not for the reason that you are probably thinking!

There are notes at the end of the book that gave some extra’s into the life of Grace Kelly as well as about perfumes and how the book came to be. I must admit I did spend quite a bit of time after finishing the book, Googling Grace and her life, I wasn’t quite ready to turn the last page on Grace at that moment and needed to read more about this beautiful lady.

This is a book that I would absolutely recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be fabulous 🙂 xx

Before the Rains by Dinah Jefferies #20booksofsummer #BookReview

I am delighted to share my review with you for Before the Rains by Dinah Jeffries. A historical fiction/romance set in 1930 India. This is one of my picks for the #20Books of Summer Reading Challenge and is number 7/20.

Let’s have a look and see what it is all about…

A romantic, heart-wrenching tale of love against the odds from the Number One Sunday Times bestselling author

1930, Rajputana, India. Since her husband’s death, 28-year-old photojournalist Eliza’s only companion has been her camera. When the British Government send her to an Indian princely state to photograph the royal family, she’s determined to make a name for herself.

But when Eliza arrives at the palace she meets Jay, the Prince’s handsome, brooding brother. While Eliza awakens Jay to the poverty of his people, he awakens her to the injustices of British rule. Soon Jay and Eliza find they have more in common than they think. But their families – and society – think otherwise. Eventually they will have to make a choice between doing what’s expected, or following their hearts. . .

This is my first time reading a book by this author and after reading Before the Rains, it will not be my last time.

Eliza is a photographer who gets a year-long job opportunity to take photographs of the Royal Family in Rajputana, India in 1930. It is a chance for her to hone her craft and hope to arrange an exhibition that could lead to further work.

The story is that mainly of Eliza. It tells of her childhood growing up in India as part of the British occupation. After leaving India after the death of her father she has the chance to return and it is on this return that she photographs.

At the palace, she meets several members of the family including Jay the Prince and next-in-line to the throne. Jay is more progressive in his thinking than other members of his family, though he still holds firm to some traditions. Jay and Eliza gradually get to know each other and he almost takes her under his wing, showing her things outside of the palace that she would otherwise not have seen. This friendship slowly grows and a more romantic aspect, it is not a sudden thing, instead, it has a tension that smoulders.

The author has some fabulous scenery descriptions and she describes the colours and sights to a point that I could imagine what she was explaining. Details of culture, religion and, traditions are touched upon and these are heartbreaking and also real eye-openers. It adds to the suspicion around Eliza she being not only British but also a widow. Speaking of suspicion, it is everywhere in the palace and outside of the palace and from various sources. The tension of the time is brought out very well, as India wants the British to be gone and they can rule themselves again.

This is a very immersive and a compelling book to read. I did think that it wrapped up a little too conveniently but saying that it did give a satisfying ending. Along with friendships and liaisons, there is also a good amount of drama, tension, conspiracy and heartbreak. The clash of culture between India and Britain is dealt with well and gives an impression from both sides. Another large clash is that of the social classes, from the extreme poverty to the extreme opulence of those in the palace.

This is a really good read that I found quite addictive, and it is one I would definitely recommend to readers who like historical fiction and romance.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be great 🙂 xx

My Week In Books (w/e 11th Aug) #BookNews #MeAndMyBooks

Welcome once again to another round up of bookish news. I do want to say a HUGE thanks you to those who shared my midweek Blog Tour review, it was greatly appreciated. Me and He have both been off work for the week so social media definitely took a back seat. I will sort out a separate post with photo’s of the places we went a bit later in the week 🙂

So let’s have a look at the books I read shall we?..


In last weeks post I was still reading The July Girls, well I finished it and WOW! In case you have not seen it this is what it is all about…

The July Girls by Phoebe Locke

Every year, on the same night in July, a woman is taken from the streets of London; snatched by a killer who moves through the city like a ghost. 

Addie has a secret. On the morning of her tenth birthday, four bombs were detonated across the capital. That night her dad came home covered in blood. She thought he was hurt in the attacks – but then her sister Jessie found a missing woman’s purse hidden in his room. Jessie says they mustn’t tell. She says there’s nothing to worry about. But when she takes a job looking after the woman’s baby daughter, Addie starts to realise that her big sister doesn’t always tell her the whole story. And that the secrets they’re keeping may start costing lives…


Next up…

A Fever In The Blood by Oscar de Muriel

This is the 2nd in the series and is feels different to the first. It is more mysterious as the duo of McGray and Frey are involved in a chase that has personal connection for McGray as they end up in Lancashire at the notorious Pendle Hil! A mystery that oozes atmosphere and is set in 1889. This is number 11 of my #20Books of Summer reading list, and I really must get my arse into gear and get the reviews wrote up!


Next is a book that is not on my summer reading list, but I could not resist it…

My Lemon Grove Summer by Jo Thomas

Last year I read my first Jo Thomas book and that was Sunset over the Cherry Orchard and I absolutely adored it. This was why when I saw My Lemon Grove Summer I had to buy it and read it. Sicilian sun, stunning setting, lemon groves… aaah take me there! A fabulous summer read.


I was very fortunate to win a Signed copy of my next book as well as an Audio CD and it has sat on my shelf for far too long…

The Good Doctor of Warsaw by Elisabeth Gifford

What can I say about this book! It is a beautifully written and absolutely heartbreaking read. I am still trying to find the words to describe what a wonderful read this was. If you have not read it yet, then please consider getting a copy!


I am currently reading a book that was sent out via the publisher for me to review…

Raven’s Wind by Steve Hutton

I am only a few chapters in and I’m really enjoying this… here is what the synopsis says…

Raven’s Wand sees two opposing secret societies waging a war of belief behind the skin of Victorian Britain. One uses magic to heal the world, while the other twists it into abominations and war machines. It is 1886 and a battle is about to be waged; Knight Superior Krast of the Illuminata is prepared for victory but fate is not wholly on his side. Many years later, the survivors of that dreadful day will meet again. Kolfinnia has a great task set before her and, with the aid of the Raven wand, she dares more than she ever dreamed possible. A tale of two clashing worlds. The world of Kolfinnia and those who wish to eliminate her and all of her kind. Raven’s Wand is Book 1 in The Dark Raven Chronicles. Book 2: Flowers of Fate will be published Autumn 2016.


Well that is me done for this week, hope you all had a great reading week.

All the best, Yvonne xx

My Week In Books (w/e 4th Aug) #MeAndMyBooks

Another week has been and gone! This has been an interesting week as well. It started off as any normal week would then finished a little chaotic but hey, it keeps things interesting.

Me and my husband both have a week off work. We are not going away anywhere instead we are having days out. One of those days out was to Lanhydrock House, it is near Bodmin in Cornwall, just over an hours drive from where we live. Neither of us have been before and we spent several hours walking round the house and grounds. Here are some photo’s

I suppose I should mention books as that is what I am here for…

So to what I read this week…

Hudson’s Kill by Paddy Hirsch

This is a historical fiction set in 1803 New York. It is a murder mystery and conspiracy novel. I really enjoyed this book and as much as it was about discovering the identity of the killer it was also aboiut tensions between the different gangs and nationalities that made up the inhabitants of the area. New York was a mixing pot of nationalities and sometimes that pot simmered and at others it boiled over. Review to follow.


Warlock Holmes – A Study in Brimstone by G.S. Denning

The caption on the front of this book just about sums the story up well ” Sherlock Holmes is a genius – Warlock Holmes is something else…” Set out as Watson’s diary entries, this book reads as short stories, it is definitley different to Sherlock, in fact the roles that Warlock AND Watson play are very different. This is a fun read and was enjoyable. This was one from my list of #20 Books of Summer Reading Challenge.


Jacob’s Colours by Lindsay Hawdon

Well what can I say about this book… it is STUNNING and HEARTBREAKIINGLY BEAUTIFUL ! It is the story of Jacob and the plight of the Roma, or Gypsies that were persecuted in WWII. The persecution of the Jews by Hitler is something we are all aware of . Something I had not thought about were the other minority races that would have been persecuted in the same way and this book has certainly rectified that and opened my eyes to their suffering. This is simply a book that will stay with me for a very long time.


Her Last Secret

Her Last Secret by Barbara Copperthwaite

I have read earlier books by this author and really enjoyed them, this one however is even better and for me is beyond awesome! The deviousness that has been injected into the story is chilling. There is a saying that goes along the lines of ” You never know what goes on behind closed doors” The secrets behind those doors makes such compelling reading. It is a fabulous book and the ending…well… read it for yourself.


Holy Island by LJ Ross

This is my first Louise Ross book and I think I have just found a series that I am going to really enjoy. This was a wonderful book that uses the backdrop of The Holy Island of Lindisfarne, Northumberland. Only being accessable twice a day as the tide goes out, it gives a twist on an isolted community. An interesting and enjoyable read and this is also one of my #20Books.


Currently Reading…

The July Girls by Pheobie Locke

I should be reading more of my #20Booksof Summer list, but when I got this one I had to read it. I have seen many reviews about it and they have been favourable to say the least. I am a third of the way through and I am intrigued, nervous and can’t wait to sit down and finish it.


Now as I mentioned my and He are both on holiday for a week. This means I won’t be around much as we are having quality time together having days out as well as getting caught up on the odd jobs. So I apologise if I don’t get to share the amount of posts I normally would as I am only popping in and out.

I hope you all have a fabulous week 😘

Sunshine and Sweet Peas in Nightingale Sqaure by Heidi Swain #20booksofsummer #BookReview

I am delighted ot be sharing my review for Sunshine and Sweet Peas in Nightingale Square by Heidi Swain.

This is the 6th book I have read in the #20 Books of Summer Reading Challange. So, lets have a look and see what it is about…

Kate is on the run from her almost-divorced husband who is determined to have her back, and she has found the perfect place to hide… a little cottage on Nightingale Square in Norwich, far away from her old life in London. But the residents of Nightingale Square don’t take no for an answer, and Kate soon finds herself pulled into a friendship with Lisa, her bossy but lovely new neighbour.

Within a matter of days Kate is landed with the job of campaigning the council to turn the green into a community garden, meanwhile all the residents of Nightingale Square are horrified to discover that the Victorian mansion house on the other side of the square has been bought by developers. But when all hope is lost, the arrival of a handsome stranger is sure to turn things around! 

Heidi Swain is the perfect summer read – you’ll want to find your own green space, stretch out in the sun and dive into life at Nightingale Square.

After seperating from her husband, and trying to lie low, Kate decides to move into an old cottage in Nightingale Square. It’s ideally situated and puts distance between herself and her ex-husband and also her mother. Nightingale Square is a lovely secluded area where she can just be herself and be by herself. Well, that was her plan, the thing is, is that Nightingale Square is a friendly and welcoming area and it’s residents don’t take no for an answer when it comes to getting to know you and getting you involved!

I love the idea of this square, friendly neighbours, an area with history and a warm generous community spirit. Heidi Swain has created a and conjured a wonderful setting without a doubt. She had me hooked from the first few pages.

Kate has had past problems and believes that moving somewhere new will help. But we readers all know that running away from problems doesn’t solve them. Kate is an old romantic who believes that once you have loved and lost, you will never love again! As she has left her husband that’s it as far as she is concerned.

The square is perfect for Kate as the history of it appeals to the antique dealer and history buff in her. There is a main house that dominates the square, but it is due for redevelopment and the new owners will most likely pull it down. The sense of community spirit just oozes from the pages as does the tense romance that hovers in the air. But as things start to heat up along comes a spanner to be thrown into the mix.

This is a wonderful book that is perfect for summer reading. It has drama and tension of the romantic kind as well as friendships and misunderstandings. It is a book I would happily and absolutely recommend to readers.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be fabulous 🙂 xx

The Beekeeper of Aleppo by Christine Lefteri #20booksofsummer #BookReview

I am delighted to be sharing my review for The Beekeeper of Aleppo by Christine Lefteri. I have decided to include this one in the # 20 Book of Summer reading challange, this makes numer 5 of 20.

Let us have a look and see what it is all about…

In the midst of war, he found love
In the midst of darkness, he found courage
In the midst of tragedy, he found hope

The Beekeeper of Aleppo

What will you find from his story?

Nuri is a beekeeper; his wife, Afra, an artist. They live a simple life, rich in family and friends, in the beautiful Syrian city of Aleppo – until the unthinkable happens. When all they care for is destroyed by war, they are forced to escape. But what Afra has seen is so terrible she has gone blind, and so they must embark on a perilous journey through Turkey and Greece towards an uncertain future in Britain. On the way, Nuri is sustained by the knowledge that waiting for them is Mustafa, his cousin and business partner, who has started an apiary and is teaching fellow refugees in Yorkshire to keep bees. 

As Nuri and Afra travel through a broken world, they must confront not only the pain of their own unspeakable loss, but dangers that would overwhelm the bravest of souls. Above all – and perhaps this is the hardest thing they face – they must journey to find each other again.

Moving, powerful, compassionate and beautifully written, The Beekeeper of Aleppo is a testament to the triumph of the human spirit. Told with deceptive simplicity, it is the kind of book that reminds us of the power of storytelling.

The synopsis does a great job of explaining what this story is all about. The story of a man and his wife escaping their war-ravaged home in Aleppo, Syria and their journey to Britain as asylum seekers.

Nuri and Afra had a wonderful life, him a beekeeper and her an artist. The tensions in Syria gradually get closer to their home and they decide to leave, not an easy decision to make but one that becomes necessary if they are to survive.

The story flits back and forth telling of their lives in Aleppo and their journey to the UK. A hard journey that has no guarantee of survival or that when they arrive that they will be allowed to stay. Nuri and Afra are luckier than some as they have funds and can pay for certain things that are denied others. Some will start their journey and get no further than some of the refugee camps, some will die on the way, some will never leave their homes.

This is a heartbreaking read at times as I read about various people that Nuri and Afra meet along their journey. This is where the author uses her experiences of helping in refugee camps to help with her story. She has spoken to people in the camps, listened to their stories and created a novel that has some of its roots based in fact.

There is a great deal of emotion with this book, from anger at the way people are treated to compassion at the way people will help. It is heartbreaking as well as the story that the author has crafted around Nuri and Afra is slowly revealed.

I cannot imagine having to take such a journey that is so full of uncertainty but also necessity and for that I count myself very lucky. This is a beautifully written story that I simply could not put down. I had to know what happened to Nuri and Afra and also learn more of these interesting characters.

It is a story that I would absolutely recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

The Last Spell Breather by Julie Pike #BookReview

I am delighted to share my thoughts on The Last Spell Breather by Julie Pike. This is a Young Adult book that is full of magic and that this Adult Reader enjoyed as well!

Let’s have a look and see what it is all about…

A stunning fantasy debut, enter the unique world of the Spell Breathers. 


Spell Breathing does not come naturally to Rayne – she loathes the hours of practice, the stacks of scrolls, and the snapping mud devils that cover her mothers precious spell book. 


But it is spell breathing that keeps her village safe from the dreaded monster curse that plagues their world. It is ancient powerful magic, but as Rayne learns to her horror . . . it is also fragile. 


In one clumsy move, the magic that keeps them safe is broken, her village is plunged into danger, and an incredible adventure begins . . .

12 Year old Rayne is learning to be a Spell Breather and is an apprentice to her mum. They live in Penderin, a village hidden behind an invisible barrier that keeps them hidden from the world outside. The world is one where monsters roam. Raynes mother has to make a journey out of the village and leaves Rayne in charge of the Spell Book for safekeeping. It is not very long before there is an accident, the only person to help is her mum. So Rayne decides she will have to go after her.

This is a wonderful story that Older, as well as Young Adult Reader, will enjoy. The author has built up a magical story with an array of goodie and baddies and has a nice balance between the good and evil in the story. Magical is a pertinent word for this story as there are spells that are woven and spoken, being cast on the breath of the speaker. The spells are used to help people in their ailments, problems and also to provide protection, or at least that is what Rayne’s mum uses them for! On the flip side of this is what happens when the spells are used for self-empowerment.

The pacing of the story is good, the story flows nicely and it meant I wasn’t rushing the reading to find out what was going to happen next and still kept me turning pages eagerly.

There is a good range of characters, some good, some bad and some that left me which side they were on! Enough to provide a depth to the story but without being confusing trying to remember who was who and what role they played. They added diversity to the story that at times felt like a fairy tale.

I liked the focus on the words themselves that are included in the spell making. Not only using alternative words but also including the feeling a certain spell should feel like. It is a way of accessing feelings for younger readers. At the end of the book, the author has a great few pages about words and how you would create a spell. Using a thesaurus to find different words and then putting them together. I liked this inclusion because it encourages the younger reader to use their imagination and also learn new words at the same time. This is something that would have really appealed to me as I began my reading journey as a younger reader.

A great story that I, and older reader, thoruoughly enjoyed and would highly recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

My Week In Books (w/e 28/07/19) #MeAndMyBooks

Hello once again to another weekly wrap-up of the books I have read this week. I seem to be on a roll this week with books!

So I have to mention the weather! While everyone has been roasting in scorching temperatures, down here in Cornwall we have had some cooler weather. Still warm but not the roasting that others have had to struggle with.

So, down to what I have read…

Clear My Name by Paula Daly…

This is the last Blog Tour Book until September and it was an absolute corker. Carrie is imprisoned for murdering her husbands mistress. Tess works for a charity that deals with cases that deal with false imprisonment. Is Carrie guilty or is she innocent? Look out for my review next week!


The Last Spell Breather by Julie Pike

This is a Young adult book that I thoroughly enjoyed. Full of magic, spells, good and evil. I liked the way the author approached this story and also at the end adds encouragement to youner readers to help their vocabulary and also feed their imagination. It is a book I would have loved as a younger reader!


The Beekeeper of Aleppo by Christie Lefteri

I won a copy of this book a few weeks ago, or it could be a couple of months ago!!! I’m really not sure! Anyway, this is a stunning story that follows the story of Nuri and his wife Afra from war torn Aleppo, Syria to the UK. A beautiful yet heartbreaking story that I am gutted that it took me so long to get to. Review will follow.


Sunshine and Sweet Peas in Nightingale Square by Heidi Swain

What an absolutely wonderful book, so wonderful I read it in one sitting! A story that left me wishing I could live with the fabulous characters in Nightingale Square. A story that completely hooked me from the very first page and wrapped me up completely. A story of friendship and smouldering romance. A perfectly ideal summery read.


Before the Rains by Dinah Jeffries

This is a stunning historical fiction set in 1930, Rajputana, India. A story of a photo-journalist Eliza, a widow. Her status does not sit well with the more traditionalist residents of the Royal Palace. Even more so the fact that she is a British woman. She has many things that could go against her and her friendship with the Prince is definitely one that may cause problems. A story that has emotion, history and culture that is another fabulous and immersive read.


Waiting for Tom Hanks by Kerry Winfrey – Audio Book

I was looking for something a little more lighter to listen to and this seemed to fit. Annie is a complete and utter rom com film fan. She is unlucky in love as she waits for the perfect man who will fit into what she believes will be her perfect life. She thinks love should be like love that is seen on the big screen. The perfect moments, the perfect man, the perfect life… A fun listen that I enjoyed and was a good escape book.


What I am currently reading and listening to…

Hudson’s Kill by Paddy Hirsch – I am currently half way through this historical fiction / crime book.

Stardust by Neil Gaiman – Audio via Borrowbox. This is a full cast dramatisation of a story I really enjoyed. Just started this book and I am loving the actors on this already…


Well that’s me done for another week!

Happy Reading Folks! 🙂