The Lost Child by Emily Gunnis @EmilyGunnis @annecater #RandomThingsTours #headlinepg #familysecrets #BookReview

I am delighted to share my review for The Lost Child by Emily Gunnis as part of the Blog Tour. My huge thanks to Anne at Random Things Tours for my Tour spot and also for my copy of this fabulous book.

Let me show you what it is about…

From the author of the runaway bestseller The Girl in the Letter comes a heartwrenching, twisting novel of betrayal, tragedy and a shocking family secret buried for decades.

1960. Thirteen-year-old Rebecca lives in fear of her father’s temper. As a storm batters Seaview Cottage one night, she hears a visitor at the door and a violent argument ensues. By the time the police arrive, Rebecca’s parents are dead and the visitor has fled. No one believes Rebecca heard a stranger downstairs…

2014. Iris, a journalist, is sent to cover the story of a new mother on the run with her desperately ill baby. But fatefully the trail leads to the childhood home of Iris’s own mother, Rebecca…Seaview Cottage.

As Iris races to unravel what happened the night Rebecca’s parents were killed, it’s time for Seaview Cottage to give up its secrets.

Purchase Link – Amazon UK

Well what a hear-wrenching read this book was as I was taken into the lives of the female characters in this tale. This story is told across different time-lines and from a slower start it gradually builds up momentum.

I think the slower start to this story was ideal for gradually getting to know the characters in the story, by doing this, the author made me care and wan to know more about them. The main characters have a link that is not fully realised until a lot later in the book.

There are various conditions that are dealt with in this story and I do think the author has dealt with them well. These conditions are psychological ones and the author has used them to show how it is not only to be affected by them but also with them.

The story has mystery and intrigue wrapped throughout and it had me hooked as I was gradually shown how the various threads would be drawn together and the links were to be connected. Family secrets are unearthed as the full scale of past events finally see the light of day.

This is an emotional read as the author did a wonderful job of creating characters I cared about, there were heartbreaking revelations and secrets that added an air of suspense. A wonderfully written story that would be ideal for fans who like stories with different timelines and delve into families and their hidden secrets. Thoroughly enjoyable read and one that I would definitely recommend.

’ve wanted to be an author since my mum, Penny Vincenzi, got her first book deal when I was 13. We’d spend hours walking and talking about the worlds her characters inhabited and unpicking any plot dead ends she’d found herself in. I absolutely loved it – this is what I wanted to do!

Fast forward 30 years and I’ve discovered it’s a great deal harder than my mother made it look! But still, here I am.

After graduating I wrote scripts and had two episodes of BBC Doctors commissioned but didn’t like all the input from Script Editors and Producers. So, while I worked in various PA jobs I decided to go for it and just kept learning as much as I could until I sold my debut novel, The Girl in the Letter, which has sold nearly half a million copies worldwide and been translated into 17 languages! 

My second novel, The Lost Child, is out now in Kindle and Paperback and I would love to hear what you think via my website http://www.emilygunnis.com!

I live in Sussex with my husband Steve and our two beautiful, crazy, girls, Grace and Eleanor. 

If you’d like to get in touch please also try me at Twitter @EmilyGunnis, Instagram @emilygunnis and Facebook @emilygunnisauthor.

I love hearing from my readers and I’d love to know what you think of The Girl in the Letter and The Lost Child, so please get in touch.

Check out the stops on the Blog Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Mine by Clare Empson @ClareEmpson2 @Tr4cyF3nt0n #CompulsiveReaders #OrionBooks #BookReview

I am delighted to be sharing my review today for Mine by Clare Empson. I would like to say a big thank you Tracy at Compulsive Readers for my spot onthe Blog Tour and for arranging my copy of this wonderful book.

Let me show you what it is all about…

Who am I? Why am I here? Why did my mother give me away?’

On the surface, Luke and his girlfriend Hannah seem to have a perfect life. He’s an A&R man, she’s an arts correspondent and they are devoted to their new-born son Samuel.

But beneath the gloss Luke has always felt like an outsider. So when he finds his birth mother Alice, the instant connection with her is a little like falling in love.

When Hannah goes back to work, Luke asks Alice to look after their son. But Alice – fuelled with grief from when her baby was taken from her 27 years ago – starts to fall in love with Samuel. And Luke won’t settle for his mother pushing him aside once again…

One word…Wow!

What an emotional story Mine was, I say emotional but actually it was an emotional roller-coaster. The synopsis tells you the basics you need to know about this story and to be honest I am not going to really expand on that.

The story is essentially two stories that are intertwined in a Now and Then format. The Now part of the story of Luke and how he finally gets to meet Alice, his birth mother, and how their relationship builds. The second story is about Alice and her journey through Art school, life and to the point of giving her son up for adoption.

There are obviously others in the story, Hannah is Luke’s partner and together they have Samuel, there is Luke’s mother as well. In the past there are those important to Alice, such as renowned artist Rick.

During this slower paced story the there are various aspects that the author has dealt with and I think has done very well. There is an obvious impact of reconnecting with a birth parent, expectations, questions, guilt are just the tip of the iceberg. The impact is felt for all that are part of the family and in someways careful managing is needed.

The emotion aspect of the story was gradually built up, from the initial nervousness of a first meeting to Alice becoming part of the family. While the story does have a psychological thriller feel to it, it is more about family relationships, and it has a more dramatic second half.

A fabulous read that had some surprises, and though I did have a nervous feeling I wasn’t quite expecting the way the author played her story line out. A cracking read for readers who like a book that has a slower build-up, that is as much about family life and relationships as it is the psychological thriller. It is one I would definitely recommend.

Clare Empson is a journalist with a background in national newspapers and has worked as a small business editor, finance correspondent and fashion at the Mail on Sunday and the Daily Express. Clare freelances for The Sunday Telegraph, The Sunday Times, the Evening Standard and Tatler amongst others. She currently works as editor/founder of experiential lifestyle website http://www.countrycalling.co.uk.

Him was her debut novel. Her second novel Mine is an exploration of the fraught relationship between a birth mother and her adopted son set against a backdrop of a passionate love affair in the 70s.

Check out the other stops on the Blog Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

American Dirt by Jeannie Cummins #BookReview

I am delighted to share my review for American Dirt by Jeannie Cummins. I read this book a few weeks ago and am just now sharing it. I do have quite a few books from my own TBR to get caught up on…

Let me show you what this book is all about…

También de este lado hay sueños. On this side, too, there are dreams.

Lydia Quixano Pérez lives in the Mexican city of Acapulco. She runs a bookstore. She has a son, Luca, the love of her life, and a wonderful husband who is a journalist. And while there are cracks beginning to show in Acapulco because of the drug cartels, her life is, by and large, fairly comfortable.

Even though she knows they’ll never sell, Lydia stocks some of her all-time favorite books in her store. And then one day a man enters the shop to browse and comes up to the register with a few books he would like to buy—two of them her favorites. Javier is erudite. He is charming. And, unbeknownst to Lydia, he is the jefe of the newest drug cartel that has gruesomely taken over the city. When Lydia’s husband’s tell-all profile of Javier is published, none of their lives will ever be the same.

Forced to flee, Lydia and eight-year-old Luca soon find themselves miles and worlds away from their comfortable middle-class existence. Instantly transformed into migrants, Lydia and Luca ride la bestia—trains that make their way north toward the United States, which is the only place Javier’s reach doesn’t extend. As they join the countless people trying to reach el norte, Lydia soon sees that everyone is running from something. But what exactly are they running to?

This is a book that has a political aspect to it, it is about immigration into North American from South America. It is the story of a mother and her 8 year old son having to leave their home and make a 2,600 mile journey to start a new life.

Lydia and her son Luca are the only members of their family that have survived a brutal attack. Lydia realises that in order for her and her son to survive they must leave their home in Acapulco and make there way to North America.

The author has created a fictional account of a journey that many thousands have made. It is a story I enjoyed, even though it sounds very wrong to say this, I found it to be very compelling and very hard to put down.

Lydia and Luca meet several people on their journey. Some are very happy to help and give them and other travellers little food parcels, or turn on a hose pipe so they can wash, brush their teeth and refill water bottles. A simple show of humanity that is the difference between life and death.

The story takes the two across the countryside, through deserts, town, villages and cities. Travelling on top of a train, in the back of a truck or walking miles is part of what they have to do to survive.

This is a story that shows that determination, a story that shows what a parent will do to make sure her child has the best that can be given.

A book that was an eye-opener for various reasons, there are mentions of how cartels, smugglers, border patrols and officials all have a hand in this aspect of life. Some are good and turn a blind eye or give water and food, others are just there to take whatever they can.

A story that I would definitely recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Magpie Lane by Lucy Atkins #BookReview

I am delighted to share my review for Magpie Lane by Lucy Atkins and what an absolutely brilliant read this was.

Let me show you what it is all about…

When the eight-year-old daughter of an Oxford College Master vanishes in the middle of the night, police turn to the Scottish nanny, Dee, for answers.

As Dee looks back over her time in the Master’s Lodging – an eerie and ancient house – a picture of a high achieving but dysfunctional family emerges: Nick, the fiercely intelligent and powerful father; his beautiful Danish wife Mariah, pregnant with their child; and the lost little girl, Felicity, almost mute, seeing ghosts, grieving her dead mother.

But is Dee telling the whole story? Is her growing friendship with the eccentric house historian, Linklater, any cause for concern? And most of all, why was Felicity silent?

Roaming Oxford’s secret passages and hidden graveyards, Magpie Lane explores the true meaning of family – and what it is to be denied one.

What an absolutely amazing read this book was. Occasionally books are referred to as being memorising and for me, Magpie Lane was just that.

The story is told from the perspective of Dee, she is answering questions at the police station in Oxford regarding the disappearance of her charge Felicity Law. This is a little girl who has been through a lot. Her father Nick and Stepmother Mariah both have intensive jobs and Dee seems to be the right fit.

The story of Dee’s past, her job with the Law family is gradually teased out through Dee’s memories as she is being interviewed. The quotations she is asked is the spark for each of these memories.

A bigger picture is gradually revealed in a very atmospheric, haunting and heartbreaking tale. A picture of a dysfunctional, hardworking and stress filled family emerges. It is an intricately woven plot that was easy to follow.

This is a slow burner of a tale that just wrapped itself around me, it was a sombre and subtle read that was so well written. I suppose you could call it a domestic thriller and yes it is but in an almost understated way. It is a story of lives hit by grief, expectations, worry and hurt but it also has a strong feeling of friendship, trust and acceptance.

I adored this book from the first few pages and as much as I wanted to discover how the book would end, I didn’t want it to. It is a book that was so beautifully written and had such an atmospheric feel to it.

This is a book that readers who like a quieter read that at the same time has a tense and dramatic edge to it. It slowly unwraps and tells the story and is a gripping read. I absolutely adored it and I would Highly Recommend it.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

The Widows Mite by Allie Cresswell @Alliescribbler @rararesources #BookReview

I am absolutely delighted to share my review for The Widow’s Mite by Allie Cresswell with you all today. My huge thanks to Rachel for my spot on the Blog Tour and for also arranging an e-copy of this terrific book for me to read.

Let me show you what it is all about…

Minnie Price married late in life. Now she is widowed. And starving.
No one suspects this respectable church-goer can barely keep body and soul together. Why would they, while she resides in the magnificent home she shared with Peter?


Her friends and neighbours are oblivious to her plight and her adult step-children have their own reasons to make things worse rather than better. But she is thrown a lifeline when an associate of her late husband arrives with news of an investment about which her step-children know nothing.
Can she release the funds before she finds herself homeless and destitute?

Fans of ‘The Hoarder’s Widow’ will enjoy this sequel, but it reads equally well as a standalone.

Purchase Links – Amazon UK or US

Minnie had married Peter and had a life that she loved with a man that she loved. His sudden death understandably shocks her and leaves her feeling vulnerable, luckily Peter’s grown up children are on hand to help take care of the will and finances. Unfortunately it appears that Peter has made no allowance for Minnie, or so it seems.

This is such a wonderful read, it is heartbreaking at times to see Minnie so destitute but still helping others out. Minnie is a proud woman and will not admit to the position she finds herself in. From those outside looking in they see a woman who is tight and miserly, I mean how can a woman who lives in a large 5 bedroom house have any worries?

The author has created a network who gradually become part of Minnie’s life, they can possibly see changes in Minnie but they never know the full extent of Minnie’s life. It is that old saying “that you never know what goes on behind closed doors” that constantly sprang to mind as I read this story.

Minnie’s predicament is one that many people find themselves in, it is one that leaves them vulnerable and open to being taken advantage of. There is always the hope that something will work out, finding it easier to deal with hope than deal with the cold hard truth!

This is a story of friendship, pride and denial and was a wonderful read. It had my heart going out to Minnie and also some of her friends. The author has included tantelising snippets about them that shows that Minnie isn’t the only one with problems. A story that I would definitely recommend.

Allie Cresswell was born in Stockport, UK and began writing fiction as soon as she could hold a pencil. 

She did a BA in English Literature at Birmingham University and an MA at Queen Mary College, London.

She has been a print-buyer, a pub landlady, a book-keeper, run a B & B and a group of boutique holiday cottages. Nowadays Allie writes full time having retired from teaching literature to lifelong learners.

She has two grown-up children, two granddaughters, two grandsons and two cockapoos but just one husband – Tim. They live in Cumbria, NW England.

The Widow’s Mite is her tenth novel.

You can contact her via her- WebsiteFacebookTwitter

Check out the other stops on the Blog Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Belvedere Crescent by Misha Herwin @MishaHerwin #BookReview

I am delighted to share my review for Misha Herwin’s latest book Belvedere Crescent. It was published yesterday and I would like to wish a slightly lare “Happy Publication Day to you Misha”, and also thank you for my e-copy of the book which I have honestly reviewed.

Let me show you what Belvedere Crescent is all about…

Abandoned as babies, twins Sadie and Thea have been brought up by their Great-Aunt Jane. When Jane dies, they inherit her house in Belvedere Crescent. The only home they have ever known, it is a place where time slips and slides and what once might have seemed safe is revealed to be full of dark secrets and hidden dangers.

I have only recently started reading this authors books when I read the first two books in her Letty Parker series. Belvedere Crescent is very different from those books and was a really good way of discovering a different writing style.

Belvedere Crescent was a brilliantly atmospheric read as I discovered as I began the book. Twin sisters Sadie and Thea had been brought up by their Great Aunt Jane, not a conventional childhood compared to other children. After Aunt Jane dies the girls are left to deal with the house and its contents and decide what to do with it. The contents of the house go back generations and there is more than meets the eye.

The story is a sad one as the history of the family is gradually told in rather a unique way, it has a chilling side and the house has not been a happy one. Events of the past are merged with the present to tell a tale that is one of grief, sadness and generations of family.

The author has done such a good job of twisting the histories of various family members and gradually unearths the secrets of its past residents. I really enjoyed how the author made the past just as important as the present and still kept the lines clear.

I am aware that this is yet another one of my “vague reviews” and there is so much I want to tell you about and can’t as I would completely ruin the story. The author has successfully injected elements of danger, mystery and suspense into this book and I was absolutely riveted from the first few pages.

If you like a story that has a bit of suspense, family history, secrets, mystery, danger, suspense and then a few other things as well then you really should go and grab a copy of this book. It is a book that successfully dips its toes across a few genres and I thought it was a great read, so much so that it became a “read this in one-sitting book”. I would also definitely recommend it.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

Fresh Eggs and Dog Beds – Living The Dream in rural Ireland by Nick Albert @Nickalbertautho @rararesources #memoir #recommendedreading #Bookreview

I am delighted to share my review for Fresh Eggs and Dog Beds by Nick Albert. This is a brilliant book to read and I would like to thank Rachel at Rachel’s Random Resources for my spot on the Blog Tour and for arranging my e-copy of this fabulous book.

Let me show you what it’s all about…

Nick and Lesley Albert yearn to leave the noise, stress and pollution of modern Britain and move to the countryside, where the living is good, the air sweet, with space for their dogs to run free. Suddenly out of work and soon to be homeless, they set off in search of a new life in Ireland, a country they had never visited. As their adventure began to unfold, not everything went according to plan. If finding their dream house was difficult, buying it seemed almost impossible. How would they cope with banks that didn’t want customers, builders who didn’t need work, or the complex issue of where to buy some chickens?

Buying links for UK – Kindle Paperback Audible (all via Amazon UK) or for Amazon US readers – Kindle Paperback Audible

Oh my goodness what a fabulous book this is. Following a diagnosis from his Doctor, Nick needs to drastically change his lifestyle. Stress had been a major part of his job and it has taken it’s toll. Along with his wife Lesley, decide to sell up and start somewhere new with a slower paced lifestyle.

Fresh Eggs and Dog Beds is a fabulous account of the journey this couple made to finally discover a new home and they decide on the move Ireland. This book is great fun to read and it had me smirking so many times. It was great to follow their journey around rural Ireland as they become the latest “blow ins” (newcomers) to a life in rural Ireland.

The first half of the book was great and is written in such an honest way. Mistakes, mishaps and misunderstanding are all laid out. The quirky workings of a different legal system, buyers market and trying to find builders are all really interesting.

The second half of the book had me in hysterics and laughing out loud so many times as I read about the antics of Nick, Lesley and also their dogs and chickens. There were actually a couple of moments where I actually had tears running down my face with laughter! Nick has recounted so many moments so vividly that as a reader I could see what he was telling me.

This book is brilliantly written and I loved the open and honest style in which it was presented. This is a wonderful read about a couple starting afresh in Ireland, getting used to the local flow and way of life. In some ways it is their innocent naivety as they start this new stage in their lives that adds such a wonderful feel to the book and it also had me willing them to succeed. I have never been to Ireland and so I could very much empathise with the couple as they came across many different things. Ireland is a place I would love to visit with my husband, and reading this book has made this a trip change from want to visit, to definitely must visit.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone who likes a real life stories, and memoirs. To be honest I think this book would appeal to many readers and I would highly recommend it. It is amusing, honest, funny and heartfelt.

I enjoyed it so much that immediately after reading this first book I then immediately bought the second one and I can’t wait to see what happens to them next 🙂

Nick Albert was born in England and raised in a Royal Air Force family. After leaving College he worked in retail management for several years before moving into financial services where he quickly progressed through the ranks to become a training consultant. As a very passionate and reasonably talented sportsman, Nick had always wanted to use his training skills towards creating a parallel career, so in the mid 1980’s he qualified and began coaching sport professionally. After a health scare in 2003 and in search of a simpler life, he and his wife Lesley, cashed in their investments, sold their home and bought a rundown farmhouse in the rural west of Ireland – a country they had never before even visited. With little money or experience and armed only with a do-it-yourself manual, they set about renovating their new home, where they now live happily alongside a flock of chickens, two ducks and several unruly, but delightful dogs.
In 2017 Nick was signed to Ant Press to write a series of humorous memoirs about his life in rural Ireland. Fresh Eggs and Dog Beds (book one) was published in September 2017 and soon became an Amazon bestseller. Book two in the series was published on 1st June 2018 and book 3 in August 2019. Book four is due out in early 2020.
Nick is also the author of the twisty thriller, Wrecking Crew, the first in a series of books featuring reluctant hero Eric Stone.

Visit Nick on his Website Twitter Facebook InstagramYouTube

See what other Bloggers think by checking out the Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

How To Play Dead by Jacqueline Ward #Bookreview

I am delighted to share my review for How To Play Dead by Jacqueline Ward. This is another book that I read before Christmas and am just trying to get caught up with.

Anyway, let me show you what it is all about…

She’s watching over them. And he’s watching her…

Ria Taylor is everything to everyone. Wife and mother, the centre of her family. And the manager of a refuge for women whose partners have driven them out of their own homes.

But one night, with her husband away, Ria receives a terrifyingly sinister message. Someone is watching her. Someone who seems to know everything about her. She knows what she should do – seek help, just like she tells her clients to. But Ria is the help. As events escalate, and terror takes hold, Ria must decide whether to run or hide…

This is the story that centres around Ria who manages a refuge for women known as SafeMe. She is often confronted by angry husbands and boyfriends and is great at giving out advice, but this is advice she does not follow when she herself is the target of malicious calls and texts.

There is also a second story-line with this book, it comes in the form of a diary entries from Tanya. She is keeping a diary of abuse and control from her partner, while the abusive relationship provides a link to the main theme of the story, there is also something more. This is revealed later in Tanya’s story.

This is a tough book to read at times as the author takes the reader into a world of abusive relationships, manipulation, control and isolation. There is mention at the end of the book about the author using womens actual experiences and also talking to those involved in refuges and this adds a believable factor to the story.

The author has incorporated many angles into the story and not just the obvious ones of control, violence and manipulation. There are mentions of watching women be strong for their children, victims not speaking due to lack of trust, guilt and mortality rates. While these may on first glance look to be very tough subjects, the author has done a great job of highlighting and incorporating them into her story.

There are changes that slowly happen to the two main characters, and it was a very subtle and slow change that gradually gained momentum. As the story started to develop further I had a couple of ideas about how this story was going to pan out. Well, I was way off the mark and the author took a route I had not expected.

This is a gritty and a story that does have an impact. It has a thriller feel to it as well as a psychological aspect. A powerful and well written book that I would definitely recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

The Place We Call Home by Faith Hogan @GerHogan @aria_fiction #BookReview

I am delighted to share my thoughts on The Place We Call Home by Faith Hogan. My huge thanks to the author and also Vicki at Aria Fiction for the invite to read the book and also a spot on the Blog Tour.

Let me show you what this book is all about…

Welcome to Ballycove, the home of Corrigan Mills…

Set against the backdrop of the beautiful Irish countryside the famed mills have created the finest wool in all of Ireland. Run by the seemingly perfect Corrigan family, but every family has its secrets, and how the mills came to be the Corrigan’s is one of them…


Miranda and her husband were never meant to own the mills, until one fateful day catapults them into a life they never thought they’d lead.


Ada has forever lived her life in her sister’s shadow. Wanting only to please her mother and take her place as the new leader of the mill, Ada might just have to take a look at what her heart really wants.


Callie has a flourishing international career as a top designer and a man who loves her dearly, she appears to have it all. When a secret is revealed and she’s unceremoniously turfed out of the design world, Callie might just get what’s she’s been yearning for. The chance to go home.


Simon has always wanted more. More money, more fame, more notoriety. The problem child. Simon has made more enemies than friends over the years, and when one of his latest schemes falls foul he’ll have to return to the people who always believe in him.


Ballycove isn’t just a town in the Irish countryside. It isn’t just the base of the famous mills. It’s a place to call home.

Purchase Links – AmazonKobo Google PlayiBooks

Well I have to say that the imagery that this author has created in this book is exceptional, I loved reading the sections about the mills, the countryside and life that Miranda experienced as a child.

Then add the present day settings as Miranda, the owner of Corrigan’s Mill, is starting to feel her years, her health is not as it once was. In the wings her three children try to workout what their mum is going to do with a lucrative business and also worry about her remaining years and their futures.

These timelines have been brilliantly woven to create such a wonderful stroll through the Irish countryside and community as I was transported into the Corrigan family through the years.

This is such a gentle read and it was an absolute pleasure to disappear between the pages and discover a life that has had it’s up’s and downs over the years. Miranda was a lovely character and I soon warmed to her in her childhood and admired her resilience in her adult years. She brought up three children who are very individual and very different characters.

Ada is the more serious one, Simon is always looking for the next big deal and Callie a big name in the fashion world. Each child has a good life and in theory they should be happy, but each one seems to have a crisis and this is what finally brings them home and together again. It is only Ada who has remained at home over the years.

This is a family that should be strong together but are actually fractured. They have had opportunity and chances and yet can’t seem to see what they have. As hard as it is for Miranda to try and keep them all happy, and even with her health, they seem as distant with each other as ever.

This is such a wonderful story that opens old wounds and confronts new ones that are still raw, resentment and anger are as rife as frustrations and honesty start to make themselves shown. It is an emotional book and I did have the odd watery eye moment, but this is not what I would call a heartrendingly sad book. There are heartbreaking moments, but the story is also heartwarming as realisations are finally acknowledged.

This was a terrific read and one that I sat and read in one sitting. It was a story that drew me in and had me totally captivated with the gentle pacing and also the compelling story line. This is really good read and one I would definitely recommend.

Faith lives in the west of Ireland with her husband, four children and two very fussy cats. She has an Hons Degree in English Literature and Psychology, has worked as a fashion model and in the intellectual disability and mental health sector.

See what other Book Bloggers think of this book by checking out their stops on the Blog Tour…

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx

The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright by Beth Miller @drbethmiller @bookouture @sarahhardy681 #BookReview

I am delighted to be sharing my review for The Missing Letters of Mrs Bright by Beth Miller. My huge thanks to Sarah for the invite for this Blog Tour and for arranging my e-copy of this heartwarming and fabulous family saga book.

Before I get to carried away here, let me show you what it is all about…

Sometimes it takes losing something to see where you truly belong.

For the past twenty-nine years, Kay Bright’s days have had a familiar rhythm: she works in her husband’s stationery shop hoping to finally sell the legendary gold pen, cooks for her family, tries to remember to practice yoga, and every other month she writes to her best friend, Ursula. Kay could set her calendar by their letters: her heart lifts when the blue airmail envelope, addressed in Ursula’s slanting handwriting, falls gently onto the mat.

But now Ursula has stopped writing and everything is a little bit worse.

Ursula is the only one who knows Kay’s deepest secret, something that happened decades ago that could tear Kay’s life apart today. She has always been the person Kay relies on.

Worried, Kay gets out her shoebox of Ursula’s letters and as she reads, her unease starts to grow. And then at ten o’clock in the morning, Kay walks out of her yellow front door with just a rucksack, leaving her wedding ring on the table…

This emotional and heart-warming novel is for anyone who knows it’s never too late to look for happiness. Fans of Eleanor Oliphant is Completely FineA Man Called Ove and The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry will fall in love with this feel-good and moving story that shows you that the best friendships truly last forever.

With a wonderful sounding synopsis, how could I not want to read this book…

Life is unpredictable and you never know what is round the corner. Plans made as a teenager with lists of things you would like to do before a certain age are not guaranteed. Years go by and before you know it you are older, children have left home and you find yourself looking back at your life. This is what happened to Kay Bright. Stuck in a rut and feeling unappreciated.

This is a story that has elements that will resonate with many people, how quickly time passes. Kay feels that she has spent most of her life supporting her husband, he owns and runs four stationary shops leaving Kay doing the main bulk of the parenting, household management and also spending time working in one of the shops. Because they are business owners holidays have been quick or cut short.

Feeling unhappy and wishing for more Kay decides she is leaving, she wants to travel and needs her own space to work out what she wants out of life. Walking out of her 29 year marriage causes more ripples than she had originally bargained for, there are tears, anger and frustrations.

Keeping in touch with her friends has been part of Kay’s life, one of her friends lives a long way away and it was through letters that they kept in touch. The letters are included in this story and fill in gaps and gives Kay the incentive to visit her friend who has mysteriously stopped writing.

I think what makes this books so special is the way you see various perspectives, not just from Kay but also from her daughter Stella. It shows the emotions that are part of a breakup and also as part of your parents breaking up. It is not all straight forward and there are some eye-opening moments and some quite emotional ones as well. I did have a few watery eye moments with this book.

I enjoyed the flow of this story and if I didn’t have to go to work I would have easily sat and read this book in one sitting. It is a story of life, growing up and getting older. A story of family, friendship, truths and forgiveness, it has the feel of a family saga and is a truly wonderful book that I would definitely recommend.

I have been told that I write like a tall blonde, so that’s how I’d like you to picture me.

I’ve published three novels, with one more about to be born, in January 2020. I’ve also published two non-fiction books. I work as a book coach and creative writing tutor.

Before writing books, I did a lot of different jobs. I worked in schools, shops, offices, hospitals, students’ unions, basements, from home, in my car, and up a tree. OK, not up a tree. I’ve been a sexual health trainer, a journalist, a psychology lecturer, a PhD student, a lousy alcohol counsellor, and an inept audio-typist. I sold pens, bread, and condoms. Not in the same shop. I taught parents how to tell if their teenagers are taking drugs (clue: they act like teenagers), and taught teenagers how to put on condoms (clue: there won’t really be a cucumber). I taught rabbis how to tell if their teenagers are druggedly putting condoms on cucumbers.

Throughout this, I always wrote, and always drank a lot of tea. I’m now pretty much unbeatable at drinking tea.  

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