My Week In Books(w/e 01 sept) #MeAndMyBooks #BookNews

Hello and welcome back to my weekly round up of books that I have read, and other random non-bookishness.

I want to know… How The Hell Can It Be September Already!!!!!

Autumn is making itself felt and the trees are changing colour and are starting to shed their leaves. Mornings are darker and the evenings have a definite chill in to them.

I am getting close to the finishing line for #20booksofsummer Reading Challenge, I wonder if I will make it? 🤔

Right to the books and then I have some pics of our Sunday walk 😊

First up is…

Blindsighted by Karin Slaughter

This is the first book I have read by this author, and also the first in the Grant County series. this is an author I had heard a lot about and I do own several of her books – just one of those finding the time things yet again.

Anyhow, this is a cracking read and it could just as easily be called blindsided as this is what the author did to me as I read the book and not just on one occasion either!

If you like you crime to be bloody and gruesome and completely addictive reading then this is one you really should read. There is a really wonderful cast of characters who are mostly full of southern charm, I say mostly because obviously there is a killer out there! A fabulous start for a new for me author and a chance to start another wonderful sounding series. Check back for my full review. This is the 17th book I read for the #20booksofsummer reading challenge.


Letters to my Daughters by Emma Hannigan

This is such a wonderful read and it is also the 2nd book I have read by this author. The title is perfect for the book as I soon realised as I got caught up in it. The daughters are Bea, Jeannie and Rose, the parents are Jim and Martha. The story is about the family and how they dealing with being grown up and making decisions. Yes we all have to do the adulting stuff and I know it’s not easy, but for this family there are some extra dynamics that mean things are not quite plain sailing.

This is a wonderful contemporary fiction that has a wonderful cast. It was a story that once again captured from the first few pages. A slower, quieter read that is full of drama and a fair amount of the dramatic as well. It is the 18th book in my reading challenge.


A Boy His Dog at the End of the World by C.A. Fletcher

This is a book I decided to swap into my reading challenge and WOW! I’m so glad I did. This is a fabulous dystopian story and a little unusual in the writing style. It is told by Griz, he has never met enough people to play a game of football. He lives with his family and dogs happily until his dog is stolen.

This is such a fabulous read and one that I am savouring, the author has asked that no spoilers be given out and I get that. The author has created a story that I adored and I as I have only recently finished reading it I am still processing to sort out a review.


Currently Reading….

Well I haven’t quite decided yet if I am being honest. It will be one that will be the final book on the reading challenge and I should have it read in time. I am writing this post up on Sunday afternoon by the way 😉

UPDATE… I have just started Bird Box by Josh Malerman 😬 and now wondering if it was a good idea as I am sat here by myself reading 😨


Right then non-bookishness…

We are very lucky that we live very close to the coast, I am able to get glimpses of the sea from the house but one of my favourite views is a few small fields away. We ermmm…. well OK… I decided the We were going to have a Sunday afternoon stroll and give the dogs a run, it was breezy and sunny, so perfect weather.

Here are a few photo’s…

The dogs are Buster and Billy and are cousins. Buster (brown & white) has a ritual of HAVING to visit the water troughs on the walk back home. Unfortunately he does have quite stumpy little legs and he is not as young as he used to be, but by gum he is determined…

Attempt #1

Attempt #2

Attempt #3

… finally got there 😁 see the water coming out on the right hand side of the trough 😂

Then he decided to go and find the next water trough, this is in the next field on our way home and luckily for old stumpy legs, it’s lower to the ground 😂😂

That’s one happy chappy!

Well, that’s me done for another week. Hope you all have a good one and call back next week to see if I did manage to read the 20th and final book in the reading challenge in time!

Happy Reading Folks

Yvonne xx

Nightblind by Ragnar Jonasson #20booksofsummer #bookreview

I am delighted to welcome you to my thoughts on Nightblind by Ragnar Jonasson. This is the 2nd in the Dark Iceland series and it has been around 18 months since I read the first book Snowblind!

Let me show you what Nightblind is all about…

Siglufjörður: an idyllically quiet fishing village on the northernmost tip of Iceland, accessible only via a small mountain tunnel. Ari Thór Arason: a local policeman, whose tumultuous past and uneasy relationships with the villagers continue to haunt him. The peace of this close-knit community is shattered by the murder of a policeman – shot at point-blank range in the dead of night in a deserted house. With a killer on the loose and the dark arctic winter closing in, it falls to Ari Thór to piece together a puzzle that involves tangled local politics, a compromised new mayor, and a psychiatric ward in Reykjavik, where someone is being held against their will. Then a mysterious young woman moves to the area, on the run from something she dare not reveal, and it becomes all too clear that tragic events from the past are weaving a sinister spell that may threaten them all.

Dark, chilling and complex, Nightblind is an extraordinary thriller from an undeniable new talent.

This is set in Siglufjörður, Iceland (I still have trouble pronouncing this one!) and a killer is on the loose, the victim is a local police officer. Ari Thor is called off sick leave to investigate. He doesn’t know much about his dead colleague so Ari Thor has some catching up to do given the length of time he has been off.

this is listed as #2 in the series but, it is set 5 years after Snowblind. There is a sense of things that have happened in those 5 years. On further investigation I have discovered that the series has been published in this order, but it doesn’t follow the chronological order… does that make sense… I do hope so! Given this, I was still able to follow and in fact has left me twitching to read the next book in the series to fill in the intriguing gaps!

The story is faster paced than the first one and at just over 200 pages it is a quick read. this author really does excel at creating a brooding atmosphere. There is the feeling that people are holding things back or are working to their own agenda. The small community seems to know a lot but divulge very little. It adds an extra level of tense suspicion to the story.

There are several things that Ari Thor has to deal with. He needs the help of his old friend and boss, Tomas. While Ari Thor is a more cautious man, Tomas is not, he is blunt and to the point with his questioning and really doesn’t mind ruffling the odd feather or four.

The story has two different styles, there is the main story, then there are pages written in italics. The italic pages are from an anonymous person. I liked this switch between the two styles, it gets the old brain cells clicking and whirring trying to workout the connection between the two. I love that “realisation moment” when things suddenly become clear.

This is another fantastic read and if you are a fan of crime, mystery and noir then this is definitely one that should be on your list.

Nightblind gets a Definitely Recommended from Me!


Many thanks for reading my post, likes and shares are always appreciated 🙂 xx

Book 15 of 20

Under A Cornish Sky by Liz Fenwick #20booksofsummer #bookreview

I am delighted to welcome to my thoughts on Under A Cornish Sky by z Fenwick. I recently read my first book by Liz, it was her latest book A Path To The Sea and adored it. I have a few of this authors books and had not quite got around to reading them. It is slightly embarrassing really especially she only lives a few villages up the road from me! But at least I am getting there, first steps have been made and I have not been disappointed 😊

So then, let me show you what this book is all about…

Demi desperately needs her luck to change. On the sleeper train down to Cornwall, she can’t help wondering why everything always goes wrong for her. Having missed out on her dream job, and left with nowhere to stay following her boyfriend’s betrayal, pitching up at her grandfather’s cottage is her only option. 

Victoria thinks she’s finally got what she wanted: Boscawen, the gorgeous Cornish estate her family owned for generations should now rightfully be hers, following her husband’s sudden death. After years of a loveless marriage and many secret affairs of her own, Victoria thinks new widowhood will suit her very well indeed . . .

But both women are in for a surprise. Surrounded by orchards, gardens and the sea, Boscawen is about to play an unexpected role in both their lives. Can two such different women find a way forward when luck changes both their lives so drastically?

In Under a Cornish Sky Liz Fenwick weaves another deliciously irresistible tale set in the heart of her beloved Cornwall.

There are two main female characters in this book and that are the focus of the story, Demi and Victoria.

Demi is a mouselike character who lacks confidence. She has been passed over and generally ignored, and would rather be invisible than the centre of attention. She is in a rut and as she makes her way down to her Grandfathers house in Falmouth, Cornwall.

Victoria is the very opposite, she is confident and definitely knows what she wants and how to progress to get it. She is a woman who knows her own mind and is not afraid to add her voice to her thoughts.

Although the women are complete strangers they have a connection that neither knows about. When a revelation in the reading of a will comes about, well knocking the wind out of their sails, is a phrase that comes to mind. A bombshell is delivered that rocks the world both women think they know. It leaves them confused, dumbfounded and questioning what they believed. A chance for a fresh start for both of them? Well, maybe, maybe not!

This author has a fabulous way of creating interesting and complex characters, she develops there personalities and their traits, she explores their weaknesses and chips away at their strengths and wraps them in a well woven story. The characters have to do some real soul searching and dig deep for their outcomes, it’s not easy for them and there is a magic word called “compromise” that does not come easy, and is hard to do.

Using the Cornish landscape is another thing that the author uses to great effect. It is obvious from her writing alone that she has a connection to the area because it really shows in her stories. At times the landscape can mirror the characters, rugged angry cliffs and calm tranquil creeks!

There is a lot of family history in Cornwall, some families have lived in the same house, or on the same farm for generations. The buildings have altered or been added to over the years, but the land has always been. This means traditions, history and pride have a large part to play and the author nailed that sense of belonging, the feel of that is how it should be and also of things being done right.

This story is captivating and once again the author has effortlessly drawn me into her story. Fabulous descriptions of scenery and setting, wonderful characters who have more than a few surprises up their sleeves all brought together in a fabulous story line that flowed and wove it’s way to a very satisfying conclusion.

Under a Cornish Sky gets a “Definitely Recommended” from Me!


Many thanks for reading my post, likes and share are always appreciated 🙂 xx

Book 14 of 20

Raven’s Wand by Steve Hutton #20booksofsummer #bookreview

I am delighted to be finally sharing my review for Raven’s Wand by Steve Hutton. I say finally because the publishers, Boddington & Royall sent me a copy of this book several months ago and it has taken me until now to read it, many apologies to them for the lateness of the this review. And to also add, Yes you were right, I did enjoy it! 😊

I have included this book in the #20 Books of Summer Reading Challenge. It seems quite appropriate, and definitely unplanned, that this is the 13th book I read in the challenge! 😲

So, let me show you what it is all about…

Raven’s Wand sees two opposing secret societies waging a war of belief behind the skin of Victorian Britain. One uses magic to heal the world, while the other twists it into abominations and war machines. It is 1886 and a battle is about to be waged; Knight Superior Krast of the Illuminata is prepared for victory but fate is not wholly on his side.

Many years later, the survivors of that dreadful day will meet again. Kolfinnia has a great task set before her and, with the aid of the Raven wand, she dares more than she ever dreamed possible. A tale of two clashing worlds. The world of Kolfinnia and those who wish to eliminate her and all of her kind. Raven’s Wand is Book 1 in The Dark Raven Chronicles. Book 2: Flowers of Fate will be published Autumn 2016

The setting of 1886, Victorian Britain is absolutely spot on for this story. It is an era that still believes in the mysteries of the occult, witchcraft, superstition and traditional beliefs, it gives the perfect platform for witches and magic. On the flip side of the era coin is the the progression of industry, power, politics and propaganda. This is where the Illuminata come in, rounding up witches and destroying covens.

The story is focused around the Wildwood coven and of Knight Superior Krast. They both value the two sleeping dragons, the witches to protect them and Krast to possess them and their power.

I loved the contrast of the two sides to this “good ‘v’ evil” style story. The witches are very much at one with nature and is in harmony with living things, they nurture the young to understand their position in all things and their role in the world. Krast and the Illuminata however, well they want to possess and control things. The witches and the two hidden dragons have a power that can be harnessed and controlled, this has a double whammy as such, it means that Krast gets stronger and also the witches are destroyed. He builds great machines that cause devastation and destruction giving an almost steampunk vibe to the story.

The author has woven a fabulous story that just has a fantastic feel to it. He has successfully mixed in various things like, superstition, tradition, legend and folk lore into his tale. A nature ‘v’ man-made element is quite strong and so are the beliefs and politics that come with that, both believing they are right. It is one of those books that simply drew me in from the very beginning and had me eagerly turning the pages.

The characters are just wonderful, a maniacal power hungry Krast against the gentle coven, but don’t think for a moment that the witches are a walk over, they are most certainly not! The characters are very memorable and there are a few, but honestly, I found them easy to keep up with. the other thing I liked was that there were no strange names that I had to try and get my head around, this was great and also fitted with the time and setting of the story. The characters have traits and characteristics and as you get to know them you soon work out which side of the fence they sit, well most of them you do!

The setting is again another great contrast, the busy hustle bustle, smoke filled and noisy city of London is very different to the more rugged, tranquil, natural setting of the South West, an area that is full of legend, myth and folklore.

This is the first book in the series and it definitely wowed me. It is such an easy book to disappear into with a story that captured me and kept it’s hold. It moves along at a good pace and has a good amount of tension, intrigue, mystery and surprise.

In case you had not yet worked it out… Yes I loved this book a lot, a fantasy with wonderful characters, story-lines, settings and contrasts. These made it wonderful reading and has definitely left me wanting to know what happens next.

Raven’s Wand get a Definitely Recommended from Me!


Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be great 🙂 xx

Book 13 of 20

The Good Doctor Of Warsaw by Elisabeth Gifford #20booksofsummer #bookreview

I am delighted to share my thoughts with you for The Good Doctor of Warsaw by Elisabeth Gifford. I was very lucky to receive a copy of the book and also an Audio Cd in a giveaway run by Elisabeth on her Facebook page, that was last year!

Let me show you what it’s about…

‘You do not leave a sick child alone to face the dark and you do not leave a child at a time like this.’

Deeply in love and about to marry, students Misha and Sophia flee a Warsaw under Nazi occupation for a chance at freedom. Forced to return to the Warsaw ghetto, they help Misha’s mentor, Dr Korczak, care for the two hundred children in his orphanage. As Korczak struggles to uphold the rights of even the smallest child in the face of unimaginable conditions, he becomes a beacon of hope for the thousands who live behind the walls.

As the noose tightens around the ghetto Misha and Sophia are torn from one another, forcing them to face their worst fears alone. They can only hope to find each other again one day…

Meanwhile, refusing to leave the children unprotected, Korczak must confront a terrible darkness.

Half a million people lived in the Warsaw ghetto. Less than one percent survived to tell their story. This novel is based on the true accounts of Misha and Sophia, and on the life of one of Poland’s greatest men, Dr Janusz Korczak. 

It feels so wrong to say that I really enjoyed this book given the subject it is about, but I really did enjoy it. This is a meticulously researched book about Misha and Sophia and also of Dr Janusz Korzak.

Misha and Sophia live in Warsaw, Poland and they are the main focus of the story. Dr Korzack is a man who features in the story quite a bit along with many others who had to endure the tyranny of Hitler during WWII. Out of the 1/2 million people who were forced to live in the Warsaw Ghetto, less than 1% survived.

There are so many parts of this book that are so hard to read because of what they went through and what happened. The author paints a vivd and heartbreaking picture of suffering, devastation and pure horror of the living conditions of these people. What makes it so difficult is that I know what was going to happen as it did happen. When those living in the Ghetto are told that they will be relocated to a work camp at Treblinka, I know it was never going to be a work camp. I thought if only they knew the truth before they boarded the train! What was the alternative though, remain and be tortured and beaten to death or face starvation. This is why there were so few survivors.

Dr Korzak ran a home for orphans, this is where Misha and Sophioa meet. Dr Korzak’s main principle with dealing with children in his care was that you should look at the child as an individual. To do this you have to get to know the child and only then could you understand the child and their behaviour.

As Germany invades Warsaw, Korzak, the children in his care, Misha, Sophia and many hundreds of thousands are forced into ghettos. The conditions are squalid, disease ridden, food is scarce and is smuggled in. Escaping the ghetto is not an option as being caught is certain death. Misha and Sophia have to make a decision, stay and be rounded up and put on a train or separate and hope they can both survive the war and be re-united.

This is so emotional and hard to read, but it also shows hope and the determination. It is compelling and addictive and the author has done a beautiful job of telling this story.

I mentioned earlier the meticulous research. At the end of the story there are several pages that include the books she used to compile the facts, the places she had visited and the people she met. All these things were brought together and once she had all the facts she began to write. There are photographs on the inside covers of the book.

This is an inspiring story based on the true story of Misha and Sophia. It is a harrowing, heartbreaking, poignant story of courage, loyalty, belief, commitment and hope.

It is one I would Absolutely Recommend!

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share is always appreciated 🙂 xx


Book 12 of 20

My Week In Books (w/e 25 Aug) #MeAndMyBooks #BookNews

Welcome once again to my weekly wrap-up of the books I have read or am reading this week.

The weather is actually behaving and is like it should be. It’s sunny (ish) it’s warm and there is a yellow heat warning out, this means a 60% chance of really hot weather, no call me a cynic, but it is August Bank Holiday in the UK… that’s all I’m saying. It seems to be all or nothing at the moment…

So let’s have a look and see what I read this week…

My first book is a series that many readers and Book Bloggers will know all about. I have several books by this author and have only just got around to picking up the first in the series…

Silent Scream by Angela Marsons

Well I have to say I love Kim Stone, feisty, determined, strong willed and a fabulous character to finally meet. I was so impressed with this first book and I can see why fellow Book Bloggers absolutely rave about Angela Marson’s books. I am so glad I have started this series and the best bit is that there are several more books to read 😁


Next is for a Blog Tour, I was given the chance to read the full collection for this Tour, the collection is 3 books and… well let me show you…

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The Boxer Boys Collection by Nick Rippington

This is the Boxer Boys Collection and it is three books that follow the lives of the Boxer Boys gang. Getting to know the boys, their families and the routes they take through life was so interesting. Yes at times it is as you would expect, but the author does not go into blood and gore with some of the things that go on. This was a surprising series for me because it wasn’t what I was expecting. It is about family and friendship as well as the gang stuff. It’s also about growing up in the shadow of your father and being branded the same as him.

I am looking forward to reviewing this series as part of the blog tour in the first week of September.


Currently Reading

I am currently reading another book for a Blog Tour, this one is for…

There is no cover for it yet not on Goodreads either watch for the Blog Tour that starts at the beginning of September…

It is for the 2nd in the Battle ground Series by Rachel Churcher. A YA/dystopian that I am really enjoying, and its good to find out what is going on with the teens that I met in the first book.


Other stuff…

I am picking raspberries everyday and they are doing great, only a few are ready each day but I do freeze them, I have a good couple of pounds in the freezer at the moment… I can’t wait to turn them into my own “Almost seedless Raspberry Jam”! Almost seedless because I always manage to get some seeds through 😅

OH has been busy with the rotivator now that all the potatoes, carrots, beetroot and onions have been harvested. He does a good job with rotivating and keeps straighter line than what I do! 😂


Well as they say “That’s All Folks!”

Wishing everyone a fabulous week and hope you all have a good Bank Holiday! I am on a night-shift on Monday (tonight) so I am making the most of today (Sunday) … 😘😘

All the best Yvonne xx

My Lemon grove Summer by Jo Thomas #bookreview

I am delighted to share my thoughts with you for My Lemon Grove Summer by Jo Thomas. This is the 2nd book I have read by this author, the first being Sunset Over Cherry Orchard. Because I loved her that one so much I was not going to leave this sat on my shelf too long before picking it up.

Let’s see what it’s about…

Could the lemon groves of Sicily be the perfect place to start over? The irresistible new novel from Jo Thomas, the author of Sunset Over the Cherry Orchard, will transport you to the island of mountains and sparkling blue seas.

When life hands you lemons … is it ever too late for a second chance?

Zelda’s impulsive nature has got her precisely nowhere up until now. A fresh start in a beautiful hilltop town in Sicily looking for new residents, together with her best friend Lennie, could be just what she needs. And who better to settle down with than the person who knows her best?

But the sun-filled skies and sparkling seas can’t hide the shadow hanging over Citta d’Ora, which means not everyone is pleased to see their arrival. The dreams Zelda and her fellow new residents had of setting up a new life might be slipping away. But a friendship with restauranteur Luca could be about to unlock the possibilities that lie in the local lemon groves. And there’s a wedding on the horizon that might be just what the town needs to turn it around…

Could a summer in Sicily help Zelda learn to trust her instinct and follow her heart?

Zelda and Lennie are best friends. When they were teens they made a pact. If they were not in a relationship with their respective Mr or Mrs Perfect by the time they were 40, they would marry each other. Both are stuck in a rut and single when Lennie pulls the “pact” agreement out and suggests to Zelda that they up-sticks and move to Sicily. A fresh start, a new adventure beckons.

This is such a wonderful book that I happily lost myself in for an afternoon. The author once again successfully created wonderful imagery with her words. I was able to imagine the village and more importantly the surrounding area and the lemon groves. I have not been to Sicily, but the author made me feel as if I had glimpsed it through her story.

The adventure that Zelda and Lennie sign up for is a dream of local business man, to help -build the community he loves and get the passing tourists to stop rather than just drive past. On arrival though, Zelda and Lennie discover that things have not been planed and sorted as they had expected. They soon discover they are not the only ones who have decided a fresh start is the way to go.

I liked how the author brought in people from different backgrounds and for different reasons together, though she does not excessively dwell on those, she does give enough information about them so I got to know them a little. The main focus is on the key characters, and I have to say there is one I would quite happily focus on!…

Lemons feature in this story and does some fabulous food mentions, I am glad I read this after eating a Sunday roast or my stomach would have been growling. Along with the food, there is also a mentions about lemons, and the growing of them.

This is one of those stories that I think is delightful reading, it is perfect for loosing yourself in and makes you feel good. The author has woven a tale that has friendship, optimism, feuds, family, relationships and drama.

A fabulous summer read that I happily read in one sitting. It’s also one that I would definitely recommend!


Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share is always appreciated 🙂 xx

A Fever In The Blood by Oscar De Muriel #20booksofsummer #bookreview

I am delighted to share my review for A Fever In The Blood by Oscar De Muriel.

This is the second in the McGray and Frey series and it sees the return of the two detectives and there very different approaches in their line of work.

Let’s see what it’s about…

In Edinburgh’s lunatic asylum, a patient escapes as a nurse lays dying. Leading the manhunt are legendary local Detective ‘Nine-Nails’ McGray and Londoner-in-exile Inspector Ian Frey.

Before the murder, the suspect was heard in whispered conversation with a fellow patient—a girl who had been mute for years. What made her suddenly break her silence? And why won’t she talk again? Could the rumours about black magic be more than superstition?

McGray and Frey track a devious psychopath far beyond their jurisdiction, through the worst blizzard in living memory, into the shadow of Pendle Hill—home of the Lancashire witches—where unimaginable danger awaits.

The year is 1889 and the story begins on New Years Day in Edinburgh. Lord Joel Ardglass has escaped from the local asylum and is on the run after murdering a nurse. McGray finds evidence of witchcraft, this is right up his street, and fits into his beliefs in the occult and superstition. Frey is a man of science and believes that there is another explanation.

This is definitely a cat and mouse story and it really tests the McGray and Frey partnership. McGray is especially invested in this case for personal reasons that are explained at the beginning of the story. Frey can see why McGray is so keen to catch Ardglass, and is unsuccessful in trying to convince McGray to see things from a more productive and better thought out approach. McGray is more bull in a china shop type of guy.

Tempers are frayed and tested as Ardglass takes the two on a merry dance from Edinburgh to the infamous Pendle Hill, given it’s reputation and history it ties in well for McGray. As for poor Frey, well, he needs hits wits about him and more of that steely British nerve .

The time and setting lend itself so well to this type of story. It is full of mystery, especially given the involvement of witchcraft. The author has once again built up an atmosphere, that, as I read, I could feel the swirling mists, ominous shadows and felt a chill as I was taken into the cold and bleakly described landscape.

At the end of the story the author gives a few insights into the story, he mentions how his Phd in Chemistry helped him to create some of the dramatic elements to his story.

This is a murder/mystery that has a fabulous Gothic feel to it. If you have read the first, then I think this has a slightly different feel. I is a book I thoroughly enjoyed and left me wondering what the author has in store next for McGray & Frey.

It gets a definitely recommended from Me!

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share is always appreciated 🙂 xx

Book 11 out of 20


Holy Island by LJ Ross #20Booksof summer #BookReview

I am delighted to be sharing my thoughts today on Holy Island by LJ Ross. This is the first book in the DCI Ryan Mystery series. Although I do have a few of this authors books, this is the first one I have read. I am reading this as part of the #20 Books of Summer Reading Challenge and it marks the half point for me.

Let me show you what it’s about…

Detective Chief Inspector Ryan retreats to Holy Island seeking sanctuary when he is forced to take sabbatical leave from his duties as a homicide detective. A few days before Christmas, his peace is shattered and he is thrust back into the murky world of murder when a young woman is found dead amongst the ancient ruins of the nearby Priory.

When former local girl Dr Anna Taylor arrives back on the island as a police consultant, old memories swim to the surface making her confront her difficult past. She and Ryan struggle to work together to hunt a killer who hides in plain sight, while pagan ritual and small-town politics muddy the waters of their investigation.

Holy Island of Lindisfarne provides a wonderful setting for this crime and mystery story. It is accessible by a road at low tide, this gives it a secluded and remote feel. It’s where DCI Ryan has retreated and why he is first on scene when a young girls body is reported. She has been found in the midst of the islands ruins. Given the history of the island a consultant is required, this is where Dr Anna Taylor is called in. She knows the island, she used to live there.

This is a book that has atmosphere, it is enhanced by the setting, the ruins and the history of the area. The island has religious roots as well as pagan ones as well and the author has nicely woven in the later.

I found myself quickly warming to the characters as I got to know them and I liked the initial stubbornness shown by Ryan and Anna at the very beginning. Though as they do have to work together, they do warm to each other.

Because Anna used to live on the island, she appears to be the best choice to consult. Coming back brings up old memories and opens the odd wound. Ryan in contrast is more about the crime and personal issues he has not got time for.

This story is one that at times felt like a cosy mystery, almost like a classic “whodunit”but also has a macabre side given the bloody state of the bodies. It has several clever twists and turns that threw a red herring or two along the way. Easy to follow as there are not a huge cast involved, it also kept me guessing until the conclusion.

A good introduction for a new to me series and one that I am looking forward to progressing further with.

It is one I would recommend.

Many thanks for reading my post, alike or share is always appreciated xx

Book 10 of 20

Her Last Secret by Barbara Copperthwaite #20Booksofsummer #BookReview

I am delighted to share my thoughts with you for Her Last Secret by Barbara Copperthwaite. I have gradually been reading this authors books and I think I have just read my favourite…so far! I still have to get up to date with her books, but my goodness this is an author who is well and truly on my “go to” Author list.By this I mean that when she releases a new book, I will automatically buy it.

Let’s see what Her Last Secret is all about…

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Some secrets you can never tell.

Everyone thinks the Thomases are the perfect family grand London house, gorgeous kids.

They don’t know wife Dominique is a paranoid wreck.
They don’t know husband Ben is trapped in a web of deceit.
They don’t know daughter Ruby lives in fear of the next abusive text.
But someone knows all their secrets.

Can the lies that bind them tear them apart?

This book is beyond awesome! What a devious author Barbara Copperthwaite is!

The synopsis, though brief, is intriguing and as I read it back after finishing the book I realise how clever it is. Just the merest of hints that give nothing away about what it contained inside the cover.

They say that you never know what truly goes on behind closed doors. Those doors in this this story belong to the family home, an office, a bedroom and a flat. The secrets that are contained behind those doors are the secrets of the individuals that occupy them.

I loved the dramatic way the story starts. Its Christmas Day and the police arrive. The story then backtracks for the members of the Thomas family painting a picture of them as a family as well as them individually. The author has cleverly spun a web and added more and more deception until things are brought up to the arrival of the police. Then things slot in place, well almost…

The Thomas family are: Benjamin, the father, an accountant that is in trouble. Dominique is the mum who isn’t quite a in control as she appears to be. Ruby, 15 year old daughter is being bullied and doesn’t tell her family and finally 8 year Amber the youngest, who prefers to hide in small spaces and is called “Mouse” because of this. What appears on the outside to be a successful family is one that behind the front door is one struggling. Their stories about their struggles are individual, but when they come together as a family the dynamic shown is one that is tense and edgy.

Keeping things to yourself and not admitting that you are struggling is something that is at the core of the story. These things become secretive and eventually controlling, it then affects your mood, decisions and how you interact with other people. This is where the author really has played her cards so well in writing this story. She has successfully woven a tale that had me on the edge of my seat and I was powerless to stop reading, I started this book mid evening and turned the last page in the early hours of the morning.

By the end of the book I actually punched the air! What an ending!

This is such a wonderfully wicked, deceptively devious and magnificently manipulative from start to finish. It is a book that I would absolutely recommend!

Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be appreciated xx

Book 9 of 20