The Victoria Lie by Sarah Marie Graye #Extract #Giveaway (UK) @rararesources

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I am delighted to be welcoming back Sarah Marie Graye to my blog. I had the pleasure of reading the first book in this series “A Second Cup” and you can read my review of it HERE I also have a Q&A post with Sarah for The Second Cup, to read please click HERE

Unfortunately I have not had the time to read The Victoria Lie but I do have it on my TBR to read in the future. You can get a copy of The Victoria Lie using the universal link HERE

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Synopsis:

When is a lie a lifeline? To Tori lies are everything.

ZOE wants to end her life. But she can’t just leave a note. She needs to say goodbye to boyfriend JAMES and best friend ALISON.

TORI is waiting in the wings to fill the space ZOE will leave behind, wanting to claim both James and Alison for herself.

But with ZOE still alive and Alison’s childhood friend RUBY now on the scene vying to fill the gap, TORI realises she has her work cut out.

Just what lengths is TORI willing to go to in order to claim Alison and James for herself?

(Trigger warnings: Suicide, depression, IRA bombings, ADHD, Autism, manipulative characters.)

The Extract:

I’m sharing a section from Chapter 20, when Ruby and Alison are in Herne Bay and Ruby spots a body floating under the end of the pier…

 

We reach the end of the shortened pier (it’s an unwritten rule that you always walk its full length) and stare out at the sea. From this vantage point, the decaying structure of the isolated pier head has a foreboding air to it.

“It would have been so stupid to try and climb aboard,” she says.

“Stupid and dangerous,” I agree.

“We’ve done stupid things though,” she adds.

It she about to tell me about Zoe?

I look down at the waves lapping at the pier structure below me. My grip tightens on the railing in front of me. I know my fingers are turning white without looking at them. I should have known better than to look over the edge. From this angle, there are no long any edges in my vision, not even my peripheral vision, and I need edges to stop myself from spinning.

Without edges, there is only the long drop to water. Without edges, the drop cannot be determined and this therefore infinite.

My knuckles hold on tight. My body is on the safe side of the railing but my mind is not. I’m freefalling, freediving, holding my breath underwater as I plummet the depths. And then I’m back above water, looking down, seeing my own reflection as a cold blue face looking back at me. Except it’s not me. It’s a face floating on the surface of the water, attached to a body that bobs between the pier scaffolding.

“Look,” I say, my voice barely a whisper.

But Alison picks up on my fear and turns to me. “What is it?”

“Look,” I say again, this time a little louder, signalling with my head towards the water, my hands unable to let go of the barrier.

“Oh fuck!” I hear Alison cry.

I cannot move. But I hear her dump her bag at my feet. And I hear her take off at speed, her running footsteps stomping along the length of the pier.

“Drowning!” she cries out between breaths. “Someone’s drowning!”

I hear all this but I can’t see it. I can’t move from my spot.

The woman in the water looks a blue-ish white. She’s floating in the water face up – her eyes and mouth are closed. Her clothes balloon and billow around her. She looks strangely peaceful.

Then I hear splashing and a fully clothed Alison comes into view, lifebuoy in tow. It seems that her cries were lost on everyone because she’s making a rescue attempt alone. I watch her struggle to push one side of the lifebuoy down and scoop up the woman in it.

She manages to get the edge underneath the woman’s head and then pulls one of her arms through as well. Alison is tiny – this woman is easily twice her size – but she has found Herculean strength from somewhere and is now towing the woman back to shore.

I then hear more splashing and people shouting “Call an ambulance” and “Call 999”, but I still don’t move from my spot. I watch a plastic bottle dance across the waves where the woman’s body had been.

—end of extract—


Giveaway – Win 3 x Signed copies of The Victoria Lie by Sarah Marie Graye (Open to UK Only)

TO ENTER THE GIVEAWAY CLICK HERE 

*Terms and Conditions –UK entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then I reserve the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time I will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

 

About the Author:

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British writer Sarah Marie Graye is the author of The Butterfly Effect series, which looks at suicides and those left behind. The Second Cup, the first book in the series, was published in July 2017, and this Blog Tour is to celebrate the launch of the second book in the series, The Victoria Lie.

Follow Sarah on Facebook – Twitter –  Instagram –  Goodreads

 

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Many thanks for reading my post, a like or share would be amazing 🙂 xx